Queensland Clarion Awards


2023 Queensland Clarion Awards winners announced



ABC’s Alexandra Blucher has been named Queensland’s 2023 Journalist of the Year at the Queensland Clarion Awards announced in Brisbane on Saturday, October 21.

Blucher won the award following a two-part joint investigation into the deaths of Darcey-Helen, 2, and Chloe-Ann, 1 in their mother’s overheated car in 2019, which shone a spotlight on the Queensland Government’s systemic failure in the tragic death of the toddlers.

The judging panel said the entry highlighted how the Background Briefing and ABC Investigation Teams gained exclusive access to the family in this high-profile case, following them for two-and-a-half years in the lead up to the mother’s sentencing.

Blucher said she felt very honoured that the story was recognised for this prestigious award.

“It was a privilege to be trusted by Darcey and Chloe’s family, particularly Darcey’s father Peter, to tell their story and allow me to join them on their heartbreaking search for the truth on why the child protection system didn’t heed their dire warnings,” she said.

“I thank them and the brave former child safety officer who spoke out, for allowing themselves to be vulnerable and courageous in their conviction to seek accountability and change out of the devastating loss of these two beautiful little girls.

“I hope the story’s exposure of the failings in Darcey and Chloe’s case goes some way to raise awareness so other vulnerable children and families in the system are afforded better protection.

“Thanks also to the talented Background Briefing and ABC Investigations team members who put their hearts and souls into the production of the story for podcast and digital – and the ABC for giving me the time needed to work on the story.”

The stories were also recognised as the winner of the ‘Investigative Journalism’ award.

Other notable Clarion Awards winners included Courier-Mail journalist Frances Whiting, winner of the Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism Award.

Western Queensland-based ABC News video journalist, Victoria Pengilley picked up three awards: ‘New Journalist of the Year’; ‘Rural Journalism’; and ‘Regional and Community: News Report – Print/Text’.

The full list of winners can be found below.

The Clarion Awards recognise excellence, independence, innovation and originality in storytelling and distinctive reporting. This can be through research and investigations, well-crafted and innovative presentations, news-breaking single stories or features, and engaging, entertaining and/or informative reporting.

Twenty-three panels of judges, composed of media professionals, academics and previous award winners, this year chose 19 overall winners on the basis of journalistic excellence. Other considerations included the resources available to the entrant/s and the effort expended in the preparation of the submitted work.

“I was so struck by the quality of the entries across the board – be it toddlers failed by the government supposed to protect them, deadly siege, youth crime, drought, music in the outback, a simple act of forgiveness, and human stories of strength to lift spirits,” said Karen Percy, the Federal President of 新萄京娱乐 Media and deputy chair of the Walkley Foundation, which helps administer this hotly-contested awards program every year.

“Queenslanders should be proud of the courage of their journalists who have taken on bold corporate and criminal investigations who’ve gone the extra mile to hold politicians and other powerful figures to account.”


Keep updated: Follow the Clarion Awards Facebook page

More information: 新萄京娱乐stateawards@walkleys.com

  • ALL MEDIA CATEGORIES

    Artwork, Cartoon, Illustration or Graphic  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Nine News Graphics Department, “Jetsetting Execs

    Judges’ comments: The team behind Nine’s Jetsetting Execs graphics helped bring to life what had been a detailed investigation based on Right to Information documents. The use of imagery such as mock passports to introduce the key players, and bobble-head private plane passengers flying around Europe was visually stimulating and, more importantly, enhanced viewers’ understanding of the investigation.

     

    Broadcast Interview supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Chris Allen, Paul Collins, Tom Stevenson and Miranda Eddy, A Current Affair / Channel Nine, “Ron Train Interview”

    Judges’ comments: The ACA interview with the father of the Wieambilla killers is a masterclass in the power of an interview in a breaking news situation. The judges were impressed by the team’s ability to deliver a polished and revealing portrait of a man grappling with the horrific actions of his sons.

     

    Business Journalism supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Michael Atkin, Loretta Florance and Xanthe Kleinig, ABC, “Australia’s Scam Honeypot”

    Judges’ comments: [This] entry broke new ground on the highly topical issue of scams that are impacting the lives of ordinary Australians. The reporting was robust and considered as it looked at scams from all sides of the problem including how they arrive at Australia using sophisticated criminal networks. Adding to the strength of the reporting Michael was able to gain the trust of scam victims to talk candidly about their experience. He was also given rare access from authorities in their battle and this put the viewer at the front line at the crackdown. The reported pieces were technically excellent and the stories were told in a compelling way. The reports issued a strong community warning and also achieved an outcome by having a major bank – NAB – refund a scam victim.

     

    Commentary, Analysis, Opinion and Critique supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Ben Smee, The Guardian Australia, “Powerpoint and politics”

    Judges’ comments: Ben Smee’s well-crafted commentary uses evidence and reason to strip away the emotion from Queensland’s youth crime situation. He gets under the hood of the divisive public debate, looking at the politics driving its ‘blunt law and order response’. Smee’s sustained reporting has allowed him to share exclusive details, unlocking important political context for readers. 

     

    Health and Science Reporting supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Carl Smith, ABC Science / Radio National, “Strange Frontiers”

    Judges’ comments: In a strong group of entries, ‘Strange Frontiers’ was a stand-out example of excellence in health, medical or science reporting. The journalist combined multimedia storytelling and in-depth research to deliver insightful and impactful reporting on seriously complex science, which has the potential to change lives and society. The reporting was accessible, immersive, and stunningly produced.

     

    Indigenous Issues Reporting supported by Queensland Council of Unions

    • Brian Bennion, The Ipswich Tribune, “Deebing development”

    Judges’ comments: The jury applauded Brian Bennion for his outstanding coverage of a proposal to build a childcare centre near the site of an Aboriginal massacre in Ipswich. It represented the best of regional – and national – reporting on Indigenous affairs. Special mention also for the flawless work of Ben Smee and Michael McKenna.Their stories were of national significance, exposing troubling aspects of Australian society.

     

    Innovation supported by Telstra

    • Matthew Liddy, Julian Fell, Georgina Piper and Ben Spraggon, ABC, “Why many data breaches are still a mystery, and how they affect you”

    Judges’ comments: ‘Why many data breaches are still a mystery, and how they affect you’ used interactivity and data visualisations to instantly engage with the audience in a complex and important story. By asking the audience to enter their email into one of the articles, the experience was immediately compelling and personalised. This innovative use of interactivity placed the audience directly in the story, customising their experience and informing them of their data breach history. The inventive use of data and graphics across both articles elevated the findings of this investigation and effectively illustrated the scale of the broader problem.

     

    Most Outstanding Final Year Journalism Student – Graduating in 2023 supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Grace Nakamura

    Judges’ comments: The judges were highly impressed with the quality of Grace’s work as a student journalist. The stories submitted showed a readiness to step into the workforce as a reporter. The importance of local journalism was highlighted through this body of work, with both excellent written and broadcast skills on show.

     

    Multicultural Reporting supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Joe Hinchliffe, The Guardian Australia, “The Man Who Chose To Forgive”

    Judges’ comments: Joe Hinchcliffe writes with incredible flair and nuance about a Somali refugee who survived a xenophobic attack during his nightly bike ride in Brisbane’s outer west. Instead of simply documenting the horrifying car chase, the Guardian reporter explains in detail why Abdirashid Farrah Abdi wants to forgive the driver who intentionally tried to run him over. Like all excellent pieces of multicultural affairs journalism, it urges the reader to walk in a refugee’s shoes to understand that unique rationale. The article is a beautiful tale of compassion in a state that is all too often obsessed with tough justice and punishment.

     

    New Journalist of the Year  supported by Women in Media Committee

    • Victoria Pengilley, ABC News, “Victoria Pengilley, ABC Western Queensland”

    Judges’ comments: The judges were very impressed with Victoria Pengilley’s body of work, that demonstrated great skill in cultivating and nurturing sensitive contacts to break stories with significant public interest. The judges found her work engaging, well researched and, often, solutions oriented, despite the resource limitations of working across a wide-geographic footprint. The judges would also like to acknowledge Samantha Scott’s entry for deeply engaging and sensitively written human-interest journalism. 

     

    Rural Journalism supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Victoria Pengilley, ABC News, “Outback Queensland Drought”

    Judges’ comments: In a tight field, Victoria Pengilley’s entry was both news breaking and emotional. Not only was her work highlighting the breaking of the Queensland drought great storytelling, but it showed what can be done when there’s not much media in town, and in a very massive area at that! Her words were accompanied by particularly compelling photos and videos.

     

    Social Issues Reporting supported by Independent Education Union

    • Ben Smee, The Guardian Australia, “Violent and vulnerable: another side to the story”

    Judges’ comments: All three finalists’ are compelling, extensively researched and highly crafted exclusive stories about important topics high in public interest. Ben Smee’s series of three multimedia articles give a new, rarely heard perspective on the complex issue of youth justice dominating headlines for the past 12 months, sharing first-hand the insights of a 14-year-old boy currently caught in the system and the dismal future he’s become resigned to. Judges wished to particularly congratulate Matthew Liddy, Julian Fell and Ben Spraggon, authors of ‘Wrenching open the Black Box’ for their highly original, highly innovative and arresting examination of the algorithm behind Robodebt.”

     

    Sports Journalism supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Peter Badel, The Courier-Mail, “No Tears Left: The Paul Green Tragedy”

    Judges’ comments: This is a poignant, considered, and well-told story about the tragic death of Queensland sporting great, Paul Green. This truly is a testament to Peter Badel’s career and reputation – with the panel particularly touched by the anecdote from Paul Green’s mother that she ‘trusted’ Peter with the story after collecting Peter’s previous stories on her son through the years. The subject of suicide can be a difficult one, but Peter’s reporting handled it with grace and still allows room for the remarkable life and achievements of Paul Green. Peter, you’re to be commended on this fine piece of journalism.

     

    Three Headings supported by Ten News First

    • Cameron Atfield, Brisbane Times, “Three Headings”

    Judges’ comments: Cameron Atfield sure knows how to have fun with a pun. His clever but simple use of wordplay was headline writing that captured the true essence of the story. Congratulations on some cracking headlines Cameron.


    PHOTOGRAPHY CATEGORIES

    Best Metropolitan News Photo supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Brian Cassey – Freelance Photographer – “Voices – 100 Years & 3 Weeks – Alf Neal OAM”

    Judges’ comments: ‘Voices – 100 Years & 3 Weeks – Alf Neal OAM’ by Brian Cassey is in a class of its own and a standout news picture. From the story to the access to the execution, Brian nailed the image and while doing so told an important story. Alf’s life was dedicated to activism and this poignant portrait raises hopes that the changes he didn’t live to witness in his lifetime will come to fruition to better the future of his great great grandson, Kailan. Well done Brian, we hope to one day see this image hanging at the National Portrait Gallery!

     

    Photographic Essay  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Brian Cassey, Freelance published by The Sunday Mail, “The Voice – Alf Neal OAM at 100”

    Judges’ comments: ‘The Voice – Alf Neal OAM at 100′ by Brian Cassey ticked everyone of the criteria for this category for me. The story, ‘The Voice’, is in the news most days. Brian Cassey developed and nurtured a relationship with the subject. He focused on one man to tell a more complicated story. He was trusted, which gave him access at a very sensitive time for this community. His research allowed a depth to his storytelling. The images and words reflect one another adding great depth to the coverage. His essay tells the story very well. It is beautifully photographed.


    PRINT / TEXT CATEGORIES

    Feature Article supported by Local Government Association of Queensland

    • Kate Kyriacou, The Courier Mail / Sunday Mail, “MH17: The untold story”

    Judges’ comments: ‘MH17: The Untold Story’ tells the extraordinary backstory of the Australian investigators who travelled to Ukraine to assist in the recovery and investigation of downed Malaysian flight MH17. Through a combination of dogged cultivation of sources, extensive research, expansive interviews and beautiful prose, the reader walks the war-ravaged fields with those Australians to discover how their incredible involvement helped shape this moment of world history.

     

    News Report supported by Media Super

    • Sarah Elks and Michael McKenna, The Australian Newspaper, “Warren Entsch’s Torres Strait jab for billionaire donor mate”

    Judges’ comments: These exclusive investigative stories were the result of months of meticulous research and interviews and had significant political and personal impact for the individuals involved. The judges also highly commended the ongoing investigative work of Liam Walsh and Mark Ludlow in their reporting on former Brisbane Lord Mayor Jim Soorley.


    RADIO / AUDIO CATEGORIES

    Radio, Documentary and Podcast supported by Media Super

    • Heidi Davoren and Adelaide Miller, ABC – Background Briefing, “False Witness”

    Judges’ comments: In a field crowded with compelling audio projects, Heidi Davoren and Adelaide Miller’s ‘False Witness’ boldly raised its head with its storytelling. This thought-provoking, expertly researched and bravely told documentary was stunningly augmented by a digital feature which demonstrated first class, best practice audio storytelling which takes the form to a new level, demonstrating an innovative future for the craft. 

     

    Radio, News and Current Affairs supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Josh Robertson, Mark Willacy, Echo Hui and Kyle Taylor, ABC, “Fallen Star”

    Judges’ comments: The high quality of all the entrants in this section made judging very difficult. Entries ranged geographically from the Solomon Islands to the far northwest of Queensland to the south-east corner. Research and investigations ranged from local to international in scope. Personnel ranged from lone reporters in the outback to well-staffed program crews. Several of the stories resulted in socio-political change – new staff for a regional hospital, calls for more transparency about drought declarations, calls for professional foster carers for our most vulnerable children, and greater transparency of government changes to immigrant visas. The three shortlisted finalists were ‘Gladstone maternity crisis’, ‘Fixing our failing foster care’ and ‘Fallen Star’. The winner in this section went the extra mile, undertaking extensive research, including with off-shore police into links between the Queen’s Wharf casino and international criminal figures that forced the Queensland Attorney-General to call for an investigation.


    TELEVISION / AUDIO VISUAL CATEGORIES

    Current Affairs, Feature, Documentary or Special Broadcast supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Chris Allen, Benjamin Stivala, Pippa Bradshaw, Emilio Ciampi and Miranda Eddy, A Current Affair / Nine, “Wieambilla Shooting”

    Judges’ comments: The ACA interview with the father of the Wieambilla killers is a masterclass in the power of an interview in a breaking news situation. The judges were impressed by the team’s ability to deliver a polished and revealing portrait of a man grappling with the horrific actions of his sons.

     

    TV News Report supported by Queensland University of Technology

    • Josh Bavas, Nine News Queensland, “Ipswich City Council Secrets”

    Judges’ comments: Josh Bavas’s story highlights the trips and travel of a former mayor, former deputy mayor and two senior council leaders using ratepayer money to fund luxurious hotels and private jets. Josh was holding those in power to account. The vision available was used well alongside outstanding graphic treatments and a relatable script to break down the complexity of the story, showing what amounted to a publicly-funded boys trip. It was a long haul too – request after request for information finally came to fruition. All the while the council, and even the information commissioner, were trying to keep details secret.

     

    The John Bean Memorial Award for Television Camerawork supported by ABC

    • Mark Leonardi, ABC 7.30 Report, “Silenced by the State”

    Judges’ comments: For a subject difficult to capture, Leonardi’s work was very well stylised. He made beautiful use of light and cleverly set the scene with unexpected camera angles and evocative objects. An observational piece that was still very emotive, this was a tribute to Leonardi’s creativity and attention to detail.


    REGIONAL AND COMMUNITY

    Broadcast Report supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Michael Nolan and William Hunter, Toowoomba Chronicle, “Stalking our Streets”

    Judges’ comments: A thought provoking, powerful and interesting documentary that explored the other side of one of Queensland’s biggest issues. Excellent use of talent, especially the young offender, who was able to speak freely, without his words being edited or cut short.

     

    Feature Article or Opinion Piece – Print/Text supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Nathan Morris, Caroline Graham and Lisa Domrow, ABC, “Outback Musical”

    Judges’ comments: The judges were impressed by the overall standard of entries in this category, but Nathan Morris’ Outback Musical was a standout. Writing with flair and originality, Morris took the reader to remote Queensland outposts, and introduced us to unique young characters. As well as a rollicking read, the article was also an insight into the challenges faced by students in isolated communities and how adversity can be overcome by talent and good humour.

     

    News Photograph supported by Seven News Brisbane

    • Glenn Hampson, Gold Coast Bulletin (News Corp), “Helicopter Crash”

    Judges’ comments: Glenn Hampson’s shots of the aftermath of the Sea World helicopter tragedy are a testament to his quick thinking and initiative. He showed the foresight to find an excellent vantage point and overcame obstacles to get the shots. His long lens brought home to readers the shuddering violence of a high-profile catastrophe.

     

    News Report – Print/Text supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Victoria Pengilley, Charlotte King and Andy Burns, ABC, “Hostel Allegations”

    Judges’ comments: This team uncovered shocking mistreatment of indigenous students who had been sent hundreds of kilometres from home to live in private student hostels. Their families thought they were getting a good education but instead they were at risk of abuse and neglect while an unscrupulous operator pocketed government funding. The reporting was compelling and well-researched and shined a light on a serious gap in regulation in the hostel and boarding sector.


    MAJOR AWARDS

    Investigative Journalism supported by Brisbane Airport Corporation

    • Alexandra Blucher, ABC – Background Briefing, “How the system failed Darcey and Chloe”

    Judges’ comments: What really stood out about this entry was the riveting and dramatic accounts of the lead up to the tragic deaths of two small children. Having spent two-and-a-half years working on the story, Alexandra Blucher’s two part series for the ABC’s Background Briefing was well produced and contained exclusive interviews with family members and an on the record interview with a child safety officer who worked on the case and admits she could have prevented the two little girl’s deaths if she wasn’t so overworked. This outstanding investigation revealed the human toll of a system that failed the innocent and led to sustained questions in parliament and follow up in national media.  

     

    Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism supported by The University of Queensland

    • Frances Whiting, Courier-Mail

    Judges’ comments: Frances Whiting is a Queensland institution. Her columns and features have kept readers entertained and enthralled for more than 25 years. Her compelling profile of Hannah Clarke’s heartbroken family is a case in point. Her ability to effortlessly switch between light and shade, humour, and tragedy is truly inspiring. Frances is a worthy recipient of the Outstanding Contribution to Journalism Award.

     

    Journalist of the Year supported by The Courier-Mail

    • Alexandra Blucher, ABC – Background Briefing

    Judges’ comments: Alexandra Blucher prosecutes a cross-platform case against Queensland’s child safety department, exposing shocking deficiencies. She reveals that despite multiple warnings, authorities failed to prevent the deaths of Darcey and Chloe. We hear not only from devastated family members, but a former child safety officer who worked with the mother of the two toddlers who died. This is investigative journalism at its finest.

    About Alexandra: Alexandra Blucher is a multi-award-winning journalist for ABC Investigations based in Brisbane. She has reported, produced and researched for Four Corners, 7.30 and across other digital platforms. She’s also worked in Beijing for China Radio International. She reports on child protection and other human rights issues, government misconduct and corruption and has produced and researched war crimes stories. Alexandra has won multiple Clarions awards across multiple categories for joint-investigations into local government corruption, war crimes and environmental issues. She won a Walkley Award in 2018 for her joint investigation into local government corruption.

  • All media categories

    Artwork, Cartoon, Illustration or Graphic  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Lewi Hirvela – ABC – “Building Crisis”
    • Nine News Graphics Department – “Jetsetting Execs”
    • Mark Brown – Nine News – “Rate Rises”

    Broadcast Report  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Katrina Beavan – ABC Capricornia – “Mum’s fight for cystic fibrosis treatment”
    • Michael Nolan and William Hunter – Toowoomba Chronicle – “Stalking our Streets”
    • Erin Semmler – ABC Capricornia – “Childhood Stroke”

    Broadcast Interview  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Chris Allen, Paul Collins, Tom Stevenson and Miranda Eddy – A Current Affair / Channel Nine – “Ron Train Interview”
    • Pippa Bradshaw, Ben Stivala, Rob Barbir, David Guppy and Emilio Ciampi – A Current Affair / Channel 9 – “Kerry Dare interview”
    • Josh Bavas – Nine News – “Ipswich Community Fund”

     

    Business Journalism  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Kathleen Skene – Gold Coast Bulletin – “Developer’s demolition”
    • Josh Robertson and Echo Hui – ABC – “Dead Man’s Secrets”
    • Michael Atkin, Loretta Florance and Xanthe Kleinig – ABC – “Australia’s Scam Honeypot”

     

    Commentary, Analysis, Opinion & Critique  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Harry Clarke – Country Caller – “Reporting on terror and tragedy in our own backyard”
    • Ben Smee – Guardian Australia – “Powerpoint and politics”
    • Mark Ludlow – The Australian Financial Review – “Now the hard work really begins”

     

    Health and Science Reporting  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Emma Pollard and Janelle Miles – ABC – “Ruby’s Legacy”
    • Carl Smith – ABC Science/Radio National – “Strange Frontiers”
    • Jackie Sinnerton – The Courier Mail (NewsCorp) – “Horrors at the Spinal Unit”

     

    Indigenous Issues Reporting  supported by Queensland Council of Unions

    • Brian Bennion – Boonah Newspaper Company – “Deebing development”
    • Ben Smee – Guardian Australia – “Indigenous justice stories”
    • Michael McKenna – The Australian – “Cops Deadly Chokehold”

     

    Innovation  supported by Telstra

    • Matthew Liddy, Julian Fell, Georgina Piper and Ben Spraggon – ABC – “Why many data breaches are still a mystery, and how they affect you”
    • Cristen Tilley, Julian Fell, Ben Spraggon, Matt Liddy and Tim Leslie – ABC – “The true scale of the stage 3 tax cuts”

     

    Most Outstanding Final Year Journalism Student – Graduating in 2023  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Winner to be announced at the awards ceremony on October 21.

     

    Multicultural Reporting  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Sally Eeles, Lily Nothling and Rebecca Richardson – ABC News – “Miss MarToya”
    • Joe Hinchliffe – The Guardian – “The Man Who Chose To Forgive”
    • Elissa Lawrence – News Corp – “Home Sweet Home: Nadesalingam family back home in Biloela”

     

    New Journalist of the Year  supported by Women in Media

    • Samantha Scott – The Courier Mail (NewsCorp) – “Samantha Scott: The Courier-Mail and Sunday Mail”
    • Julian Fell – ABC – “Julian Fell”
    • Victoria Pengilley – ABC – “Victoria Pengilley, ABC Western Queensland”

     

    Rural Journalism  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Nathan Morris, Caroline Graham and Lisa Domrow – ABC – “Outback Musical”
    • Charlie Peel – The Australian – “Livestock’s methane problem”
    • Victoria Pengilley – ABC News – “Outback Queensland Drought”

     

    Social Issues Reporting  supported by Independent Education Union

    • Ben Smee – Guardian Australia – “Violent and vulnerable: another side to the story”
    • Alexandra Blucher – ABC – “How the system failed Darcey and Chloe”
    • Rory Callinan – ABC – “Christian Brothers’ foster care abuse cover-up”

     

    Sports Journalism  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Peter Badel – The Courier-Mail – “No Tears Left: The Paul Green Tragedy”
    • Adam Jackson and Attila Antoni – Nine News – “COVID Camp Exclusive”
    • Jessica Stewart and Dan Colasimone – ABC – “Sport’s Silent Epidemic”

     

    Three Headings  supported by Ten News First

    • Winner to be announced at the awards ceremony on October 21.

    Photography categories

    Best Metropolitan News Photo  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Madura MCormack – News Corp Queensland – “Cape York land handback”
    • Brian Cassey – Freelance Photographer – “Voices – 100 Years & 3 Weeks – Alf Neal OAM”

     

    Photographic Essay  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Brian Cassey – Freelance published by The Sunday Mail – “The Voice – Alf Neal OAM at 100”
    • Evan Morgan – Townsville Bulletin – “Tears for Our Fallen”

    Print/text categories

    Feature Article  supported by Local Government Association of Queensland

    • Daniel Colasimone and Jessica Stewart – ABC News – “The Silent Epidemic”
    • Emma Pollard, Janelle Miles, Heidi Davoren and Kelsie Iorio – ABC – “Ruby’s Legacy”
    • Kate Kyriacou – “The Courier Mail/Sunday Mail – MH17: The untold story”

     

    News Report  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Sarah Elks and Michael McKenna – The Australian Newspaper – “Warren Entsch’s Torres Strait jab for billionaire donor mate”
    • David Murray – The Australian – “Ric Blum Investigation”
    • Liam Walsh and Mark Ludlow – The Australian Financial Review – “Last play of a powerbroker”

    Radio/audio categories

    Radio, Documentary and Podcast  supported by Media Super

    • Ellie Grounds and Claudia Long – ABC – “Background Briefing: The tiny device that can cause huge pain”
    • Heidi Davoren and Adelaide Miller – ABC – “False Witness”
    • Jessica Lodge, Melissa Downes and Adam Buncher – Nine News Queensland – “Hannah’s Story”

     

    Radio, News and Current Affairs  supported  by 新萄京娱乐

    • Josh Robertson, Mark Willacy, Echo Hui and Kyle Taylor – ABC – “Fallen Star”
    • Annie Guest – ABC – “Fixing our failing foster care”
    • Tobi Loftus, Paul Culliver and Katrina Beavan – ABC – “Gladstone maternity crisis”

    Television/audio visual categories

    TV Current Affairs, Feature, Documentary or Special Broadcast  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Michael Atkin, Loretta Florance and Xanthe Kleinig – ABC – “Australia’s Scam Honeypot”
    • Chris Allen, Benjamin Stivala, Pippa Bradshaw, Emilio Ciampi and Miranda Eddy – A Current Affair/Nine – “Wieambilla Shooting”
    • Mark Willacy, Josh Robertson and Alex McDonald – ABC Investigations – “Line of Fire”

     

    TV News Report  supported by Queensland University of Technology

    • Josh Bavas – Nine News Queensland – “Ipswich City Council Secrets”
    • Tim Arvier – Nine News – “The Knives Are Out”
    • Seven Brisbane News Team – “Wieambilla Police Ambush”

     

    The John Bean Memorial Award for Television Camerawork  supported by ABC

    • Stephen Cavenagh – ABC – “Greener Pastures”
    • Mark Leonardi – ABC – “ABC 7.30 Report ‘Silenced by the State’”
    • Nathan Morris, Caroline Graham and Lisa Domrow – ABC – “Outback Musical”

    Regional and community

    Broadcast Report  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Jonathan Lea – Sky News – “Queensland Youth Crime. A Special Report”
    • Michael Nolan and William Hunter – Toowoomba Chronicle – “Stalking our Streets”
    • Michael Atkinson – Nine News – “The Kid Who Saved the Sand Goannas”

     

    Feature Article or Opinion Piece – Print/Text  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Keith Woods – Gold Coast Bulletin – “A mother’s pain: Devastating story of a daughter lost to ice”
    • Nathan Morris, Caroline Graham and Lisa Domrow – ABC – “Outback Musical”
    • Michael Nolan and William Hunter – Toowoomba Chronicle – “Stalking Our Streets”

     

    News Photograph  supported by Seven News Brisbane

    • Glenn Hampson – Gold Coast Bulletin (News Corp) – “Mental Health Crisis”
    • Brendan Radke – Cairns Post – “The shooting of Aubrey Donahue”
    • Glenn Hampson – Gold Coast Bulletin (News Corp) – “Helicopter Crash”

     

    News Report – Print/Text  supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Harry Clarke – Country Caller – “Wieambilla Shooting”
    • Angeline Lowther – NewsCorp – “’We are not prisoners’: An investigation into the treatment of PALM scheme workers”
    • Victoria Pengilley, Charlotte King and Andy Burns – ABC – “Hostel Allegations”

    Major awards

    Investigative Journalism supported by Brisbane Airport Corporation

    • Alexandra Blutcher – ABC – “How the system failed Darcey and Chloe”
    • Michael McKenna – The Australian – “Cops Deadly Chokehold”
    • Eden Gillespie – Guardian Australia – “Brisbane City Watchhouse”

  • ALL MEDIA

    ARTWORK, CARTOON, ILLUSTRATION OR GRAPHIC

    • This award recognises the best use of creativity, wit, style and newsworthiness through artistic media, including television and social media graphics.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    BROADCAST INTERVIEW

    • This award recognises excellence in reporting live or in pre-recorded interviewing.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    BUSINESS JOURNALISM

    • This award recognises excellence in business, economics or finance reporting.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three reports as a single entry.

    COMMENTARY, ANALYSIS, OPINION AND CRITIQUE

    • This award recognises the work of journalists involved in comment and analysis and includes leader writers, reviewers and opinion columnists covering arts, sports, business or politics.
    • Entrants should submit three (3) samples, not necessarily related, to be judged as indicative of their work.

    HEALTH AND SCIENCE REPORTING

    • This award recognises the best health, medical or science story in any medium, recognising accuracy, newsworthiness, insight, impact and public benefit.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    INDIGENOUS ISSUES REPORTING

    • This award recognises excellence in coverage of Indigenous issues. Journalists and photographers working in both the Indigenous and mainstream media are encouraged to enter.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.
    • Photographic entries may include up to six (6) images of an event, subject, or issue.

    INNOVATION

    • This category was created to showcase and promote the professionalism of original, courageous and ethical multimedia journalism.
    • Judges will consider whether a story is delivered imaginatively, effectively and with impact using innovative techniques in news gathering and presentation. These include interactive presentations, audio, video, animation and live interaction, crowdsourcing and modes of distribution.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.
    • Photographic entries may include up to six (6) images of an event, subject, or issue.

    MOST OUTSTANDING FINAL YEAR JOURNALISM STUDENT GRADUATING 2023

    • This award recognises the best use of resources, accuracy, newsworthiness, research and story-telling from a final year student.
    • Entries must have been published or broadcast from July 1, 2022 and June 30, 2023, and the entrant must have been a full-time student (i.e. not working full time) when the entry was published or broadcast.
    • Entrants may enter a body of work. Up to three (3) pieces may be entered.
    • Photographic entries may include up to six (6) images of an event, subject, or issue.

    MULTICULTURAL REPORTING

    • This award recognises excellence in reporting on cultural diversity and community relations.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    NEW JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR

    • Open to journalists with less than four (4) years’ experience in the industry.
    • Entrants may enter a body of work. Up to three (3) pieces may be entered.
    • Photographic entries may include up to six (6) images of an event, subject, or issue.

    RURAL JOURNALISM

    • This award recognises excellence in coverage of issues affecting rural Queenslanders.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    SOCIAL ISSUES REPORTING

    • This award recognises excellence in reporting on social or community issues affecting disadvantaged people in Queensland.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.
    • Photographic entries may include up to six (6) images of an event, subject, or issue.

    SPORTS JOURNALISM

    • Entrants are encouraged to enter a story or series of stories on a sporting issue.
    • Judges are looking for impact and newsworthiness and will reward ethics, creativity and application of the story to the sporting media. Analysis, breaking investigations and comment can also be considered.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    THREE HEADINGS

    • Sub-editors are encouraged to enter their three (3) best headlines.
    • Judges will be looking for originality, flair and the headline’s relevance to the story it relates to.
    PHOTOGRAPHY

    BEST METROPOLITAN NEWS PHOTO

    • This category is open to photographers who are employed or commissioned by a metropolitan daily newspaper – whether they are permanent, casual or freelance.
    • Judges will be looking for newsworthiness, impact, technical superiority, creativity and originality, along with the photographers’ ability to capture an exclusive or spontaneous news moment and depicting news-value images on the day.
    • Entrants may submit up to six (6) images on one subject, story or event (NOT theme).

    PHOTOGRAPHIC ESSAY

    • This category is open to all photographers.
    • Entrants may submit up to twelve (12) photographs of a news feature – at least one of the photos from the series MUST have been published.
    PRINT/TEXT

    FEATURE ARTICLE

    • The parameters of the medium, creativity, originality and writing flair will be highly regarded in this category, in addition to the general criteria.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    NEWS REPORT

    • Judges are particularly looking for courageous journalism, as well as writing excellence, accuracy, storytelling, newsworthiness, ethics, research, impact and public benefit.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three reports as a single entry.
    RADIO/AUDIO

    RADIO, DOCUMENTARY AND PODCAST

    • This award is open to a single-story series of reports on the same subject over five (5) minutes.
    • Judges are looking for newsworthiness and impact.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    RADIO NEWS AND CURRENT AFFAIRS

    • This award is open to a single-story series of reports on the same subject under five (5) minutes.
    • Judges are looking for newsworthiness and impact.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.
    TELEVISION/AUDIO VISUAL

    CURRENT AFFAIRS, FEATURE, DOCUMENTARY OR SPECIAL BROADCAST

    • This category was created to recognise current affairs and analysis of news events.
    • Reports should highlight research, public benefit, ethics, courage and impact.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    NEWS REPORT

    • Judges will reward reports demonstrating newsworthiness, courage, impact, incisiveness, public benefit and ethics.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    THE JOHN BEAN MEMORIAL AWARD FOR TELEVISION CAMERAWORK

    • This award recognises excellence in camerawork in Australian news, current affairs and documentaries, as well as videography and photo films in digital formats, representing the highest standards of the craft.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.
    REGIONAL AND COMMUNITY

    BROADCAST REPORT

    • The award recognises best accuracy, research impact and use of resources.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    FEATURE ARTICLE OR OPINION PIECE – PRINT / TEXT

    • Judges will be looking for best use of creativity, originality and writing flair within the parameters of the medium.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    NEWS PHOTOGRAPH

    • This category is open to photographers who are employed by a regional or community newspaper – whether they are permanent, casual or freelance. Photographers who are engaged primarily by a community newspaper, but rostered through a metropolitan newspaper, are also eligible to enter into this category.
    • Note: An entry into this section cannot be entered into Best News Metropolitan Photo.
    • Judges will be looking for newsworthiness, impact, technical superiority, creativity and originality, along with the photographers’ ability to capture an exclusive or spontaneous news moment and depicting news-value images on the day.
    • Entrants may submit up to three (3) images on one subject, story or event (NOT theme).

    NEWS REPORT – PRINT / TEXT

    • Judges will be looking for best use of accuracy, story-telling, newsworthiness, ethics, research and impact through the use of available resources.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.
    • Photographic entries may include up to six (6) images.
    MAJOR AWARDS

    INVESTIGATIVE JOURNALISM

    • Recognising its valuable role, this category rewards well-researched and presented investigations.
    • Entrants may enter a single report or a series on the same issue or topic, comprising up to three (3) reports as a single entry.

    JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR 2023

    • The winner of this award will be chosen from the winners of all the other 2023 Clarion Awards categories.

  • All entries must have been published, broadcast, or televised in Australia in the 12 months from July 1, 2022, to June 30, 2023. Eligibility for the Clarion Awards is based on independent acts of journalism, free from any commercial or corporate interests.

    All entrants must certify that their entry, apart from normal sub editorial/production treatment, is their original work and that they have adhered to the 新萄京娱乐 Journalist Code of Ethics in the work preparation; undertake to continue to abide by the Code of Ethics; and have complied with all copyright requirements. All entries must be factually based.

    Those who enter do not have to be members of the Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance (新萄京娱乐). The Awards entry administration fee, however, is waived for 新萄京娱乐 members as one of the benefits of their membership. Contact 新萄京娱乐 to discuss your membership options, or to check your membership number.

     

    ELIGIBILITY

    Queensland residency

    • Entry into the awards is based on residency in Queensland, not the content relating to Queensland.
    • Entries must be primarily the work of an entrant or entrants whose principle and permanent residence is in Queensland. The work may be supported by colleagues interstate.
    • Queensland-based journalists who undertake short-term assignments overseas (six months or less) can enter the awards.

     Self-published journalists

    • Entry is open to journalists who have self-published, including blogs and social media.
    • Self-published entrants should provide relevant URL links and, where possible, verification of the work’s authenticity. If the entrant is verifying their own work, they must make this clear in their supporting statement.

     Declaration of entrant

    • All entries must declare any legal complaints, defamation actions, contempt of court actions, suppression orders, challenges to the accuracy, corrections or claims of plagiarism, relevant to the work at the time of entry.
    • Entrants must declare if the creation of the work involved payment for information or an interview and the nature of that payment.

     Supporting statement

    • Each entry must include a 200-word supporting statement. See the Clarion Awards FAQs page for tips on what to include in your compulsory supporting statement.

     

    ENTERING THE AWARDS
    • Journalists entering more than one category must complete a separate entry form for each category.
    • Entering into a category multiple times is permitted. Entrants will be required to complete a new and separate submission for each award category.
    • In all cases, ‘report’ refers to a single report or a series of up to THREE reports of an event, subject or issue or a collection of up to SIX photographs of an event, subject, or issue – all content must be published.

    Team entries

    • Team entries may include UP TO FIVE people with the name of the team clearly stated.
    • Entries must be primarily the work of an entrant or entrants whose principle and permanent residence is in Queensland.
    • Entry must include substantial collaboration before publication on the same piece of work. This should be clearly outlined in the supporting statement.

    Entry verification

    • Each entry must include a declaration from the entrants’ employer or commissioning company. This person must verify the entry via the email they receive before it can be considered for judging.
    • Self-published journalists MAY verify their own entry, providing relevant URL links where possible. This should be made clear to the judges in the supporting statement.

    Categories

    • The winner in each category – except recipient of the ‘Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism’ award – will be a contender for the ‘Journalist of the Year.’
    • Only journalists employed by community and regional media, or in regional bureaus or organisations, are eligible to enter the ‘Coverage of Regional and Community’ category.

     

    COST OF ENTRY
    • The cost of entering the awards is $230 per entry (including GST) for journalists and photographers.
    • 新萄京娱乐 waives the entry costs for its financial members as a benefit of membership.
    • Financial members are not required to pay the entry fee except where a non-member is part of a group entry, in which case the normal entry fee ($230 per entry) is required.
    • To qualify for the fee waiver 新萄京娱乐 members must retain financial 新萄京娱乐 membership for a minimum period of SIX months after joining, i.e. if you join so you can enter the awards you must remain a member until at least February 2024.
    • If you have lost your 新萄京娱乐 membership number or would like to speak to someone about joining, please phone 1300 65 65 13.

     

    OTHER CONDITIONS
    • Judges have the right to reject an entry which, in their opinion, does not comply with the terms and conditions of the awards. The judges’ decision will be final.
    • The 新萄京娱乐 Queensland Media Section reserves the right to withdraw a Clarion Award if it later finds the entrant did not comply with the entry conditions.
    • To facilitate easy access for judging, entrants should place URLs outside any paywall. If that proves infeasible, the entry should provide a username and password for judges, plainly indicated in the supporting statement.
    • The entrant acknowledges that the Walkley Foundation may reproduce, broadcast, and communicate materials submitted for the purpose of promoting the Clarion Awards, conducting the presentation ceremony, and making the finalist and winners entries available to the public.

     

    OUTSTANDING CONTRIBUTION TO JOURNALISM
    • Each year, the Clarion Awards recognise the achievements of a person who has demonstrated an outstanding commitment to the highest standards of journalism – truth, rigor, integrity, fairness – throughout their career.
    • Nominations are accepted via the 新萄京娱乐 Queensland Branch. Please email rae@marumasu-scarves.com with relevant supporting material, including letters of nomination from peers, community, and employers.

     

    JUDGING CRITERIA

    The purpose of the Clarion Awards is to recognise creative and courageous acts of journalism that seek out the truth and give new insight to an issue. The judges will consider the following criteria as well as those in the description for the category they are judging:

    • How the story was initiated and followed (with particular credit given for instigating, breaking or finding a story)
    • Newsworthiness, including exclusivity
    • Consideration of the resources available
    • Creativity and innovation
    • Research and investigation
    • Balance, accuracy, and ethics
    • Consideration of production pressures or deadlines and time constraints
    • Demonstration of best use of the format/s in which the work was published or broadcast, including clever choices in storytelling through multimedia
    • Excellence in written or verbal communication and/or technical and production skills
    • Public impact or benefit, including audience engagement and serving specific communities.

    The awards seek to recognise excellence, independence, innovation and originality in storytelling and distinctive reporting. This can be through research and investigations, well-crafted and innovative presentations, news breaking single stories or engaging, entertaining and/or informative reporting.

    Judges will consider the resources and time available in creating the work, the pressure and demand of reporting deadlines, and the location of the journalist, taking into consideration potential isolation or exposure to outside forces, danger, or pressure in presenting a story.

     

    PHOTOGRAPHY AWARDS

    Only photos published July 1, 2022, to June 30, 2023, are eligible for entry.

    • The Clarion photographic awards recognise visual journalists producing still photography for any platform. Criteria include storytelling, courage, public impact, creativity, innovative use of technology, technical ability and resourcefulness and can include sound slides and photo film.
    • Photographers should reference the category descriptions when preparing their entry.
    • Photographers are also eligible to enter their photographic work in relevant All Media categories of the Clarion Awards, such as Camerawork, as an individual entrant or as part of a group or team entry.
    • A photographer may only enter once in each photography category.
    • Please see the category descriptions for further information.

    Number of images you can submit per category

    • News Photography: Up to five related images.
    • Feature/Photographic Essay: Five to 12 images in a series, with at least one published image.

    Entry process

    • Photographers must submit an entry statement WITH EACH CATEGORY entered.

    Material specifications for photographers

    • Images must meet the following specifications:
      • Images must be uploaded in .jpg / .jpeg format
      • Images should be at least 3,000 pixels in length
      • Each image should be saved in the jpg / .jpeg format with a medium to high resolution quality.
    • All required image information, such as the creation date, place, and country as well as the caption/description, must be provided. It can be included in the metadata of the image files or entered on the entry website after uploading the images.
    • The content of an image MUST NOT be altered. Only retouching that conforms to currently accepted standards in the industry is allowed.
    • No cloning, montaging or digital manipulation other than cropping, ‘digital spotting,’ burning and dodging is permitted. The jury is the ultimate arbiter of these standards.
    • Entrants must not intentionally contribute to, or alter, the scene they picture by re-enacting or staging events.
    • Entrants must ensure captions are accurate and provide a supporting statement that is open and transparent about the entire process through which their pictures were taken and published.
    • Participants who are long-listed by the first-round judges may be contacted and required to provide file/s as recorded by the camera for all images in order to proceed to the final stages of the contest. These file/s will be requested and examined confidentially during the judging period. A failure to provide these files if requested will lead to the elimination of the entry that will not proceed into the final rounds and will not become eligible for a Clarion Award.

  • How can I enter the Queensland Clarion Awards?

    You must register by completing the electronic registration form on the entry page.

    Who can enter the Queensland Clarion Awards?

    Entry is open to all journalists and media professionals who permanently reside in Queensland. All forms of print and electronic media are eligible for entry. Queensland-based journalists who undertake short-term assignments overseas (six months or less) can also enter the awards.

    Those who enter do not have to be members of the Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance (新萄京娱乐). The Awards entry administration fee, however, is waived for 新萄京娱乐 members as one of the benefits of their membership.

    Contact 新萄京娱乐 to discuss your membership options, or to check your membership number.

    What are the conditions of entry?

    Eligible entry submissions are for work published/broadcast between July 1, 2022 and June 30, 2023. Click here for category descriptions.

    All entrants must certify that their entry, apart from normal sub editorial / production treatment, is their original work and that they have adhered to the 新萄京娱乐 Journalist Code of Ethics in the work preparation, undertake to continue to abide by the Code of Ethics, and have complied with all copyright requirements.

    KEY DATES

    When do entries open?

    Entries open on Tuesday, June 6, 2023.

    When do entries close?

    Entries will close at 11.59pm on Thursday, July 27, 2023. In the interests of fairness, there will be no deadline extensions.

    When will the finalists be announced?

    Finalists will be announced on Tuesday, August 29, 2023.

    When will the winners be announced?

    Winners will be announced at a gala event at Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre on Saturday, October 21, 2023.

     

    ENTRY FEES

    How much does it cost to enter the 2023 Queensland Clarion Awards?

    Entering the Queensland Clarion Awards is free for financial members of the Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance (新萄京娱乐), and $230 per entry for non-members. Where a non-member is part of a group entry, the normal $230 entry fee applies.

    Contact 新萄京娱乐 to discuss your membership options, or to check your membership number.

     

    PREPARING TO ENTER

    Do I need to do anything to prepare to enter the Queensland Clarion Awards?

    As per the Terms and Conditions of Entry, all entries must include a statement of up to 200 words outlining the case for consideration of an award. We recommend writing this supporting statement before you start the online entry process.

    Where uploads are required, have your work ready to upload and make sure it is saved in the correct format.

    What is an ‘entry title’ and will I be judged on this?

    While you won’t be judged on your entry title, it will be used to refer to your work throughout the judging process. If you are chosen as a finalist, this entry title will also be included in any press releases and during the award presentation in October.

    Do I have to include an entry statement of up to 200 words?

    Yes, your entry statement is compulsory. This is an important part of the entry submission process, so please give some thought to what you want to say to the judges and the impact your work has had on your audience.

    Pay attention to the judging criteria and the category description and address these points in your statement.  It is recommended that this statement be written by the entrant themselves.

    In it, you may wish to also include contextual information so judges can better understand how the work was produced, for example your resources and any other background information.

    Please note that the online entry system will not accept more than 200 words, so it may be useful to perform a word count in a word processing document before copying your entry statement into the online entry form.

    Do I need to have my entry form authorised?

    Yes, for copyright and authentication reasons we require a declaration from your employer or commissioning company to submit your work.

    During the online submission process, you will be asked to provide contact details for your editor, producer or equivalent manager. When you submit your work, they will receive an email requesting verification of the work and related details.

    This person must verify the entry via the email they receive before it can be considered for judging by our panel.

    If your work was self-published, you may verify this yourself, providing relevant URL links where possible.

    If you are verifying your own work, please make this clear to the judges in your supporting statement.

     

    CATEGORY QUESTIONS

    Can I enter the same category more than once?

    Entrants are permitted to enter the same category multiple times, but will need to complete a new and separate submission for each award category.

    The exceptions to this rule are the News Photograph and Photographic Essay categories, which are limited to one entry per category.

    Can I enter multiple categories?

    Yes, provided you complete a separate entry form for each category.  Click here for category descriptions.

    I’m a photographer, which categories can I enter?

    In addition to the photo-specific categories, photographers are also invited to enter their work in relevant All Media categories. In All Media categories, photographers can submit up to six (6) images that were published as part of a report or series of reports on the same subject/issue.

     

    GROUP VS TEAM SUBMISSIONS

    What’s the difference between a ‘group’ and a ‘team’ entry?

    A group entry can include up to five (5) people’s names as entrants; in a team entry, a group of five (5) or more people enter a work under a single team name.

    What is a group entry?

    A group entry may include up to five (5) people as entrants. Groups will complete one (1) registration, listing  the full details for each group member.

    Please note that the order of the names given in the group entry will be the order used on all publicity and trophies. You cannot change this order after an entry is submitted, so please consult with all members before entering.

    What is a team entry?

    Team entries comprise more than five (5) individuals who will be recognised only as a collective.

    A team entry is an entry produced by more than five (5) individuals and should be attributed to the print publication or section, network or program. Please include the name of your team under ‘entrant’s name’ in the entry form.

     

    JUDGING

    How are entries judged?

    The judging panels for the Queensland Clarion Awards are composed of media professionals, academics, and previous award winners. A panel of three judges will determine the winner and two finalists based on the criteria specified.

    Judges are selected by the Queensland Media Section Committee.

    What are the criteria for judging?

    Award winners will be chosen on the basis of journalistic excellence. This will vary according to individual categories but, in general, criteria will include:

    • How the story was initiated and followed (with particular credit given for instigating, breaking or finding a story)
    • Newsworthiness, including exclusivity
    • Creativity and innovation
    • Research and investigation
    • Balance, accuracy, and ethics
    • Consideration of production pressures or deadlines and time constraints
    • Demonstration of best use of the format/s in which the work was published or broadcast, including
    • Clever choices in storytelling through multimedia
    • Excellence in written or verbal communication and/or technical and production skills
    • Public impact or benefit, including audience engagement and serving specific communities.

    Judges will take into consideration the resources available to the entrant/s and the effort expended in the preparation of the submitted work.

     

    FILE UPLOADS & PAYWALLED ARTICLES

    Can I upload video or audio files as part of the entry process?

    Depending on the size of your file/s, it may be better to supply a link in your online entry to where judges can view/listen to your work online, such as on YouTube or Soundcloud.

    I have multiple PDF pages that I want to upload, how do I do this?

    The entry system will only allow you to upload a single PDF file per story. Articles longer than a page can be merged into a single file at PDF Merge.

    My PDF file is too large to upload, is there a way to make it smaller?

    You can compress your PDF files for free at: smallpdf.com/compress-pdf.

    Are there any specifications for images?

    Images must be uploaded in .jpg or .jpeg format and be at least 3,000 pixels in length. See the Terms and Conditions for more specifications.

    What do I do if my news article or work is behind a paywall?

    Entrants will need to ensure judges can access stories and content behind a paywall. Please upload these articles as PDF files, where possible.

    Note: If you are providing links to paywalled articles or other paywalled works, you will need to include instructions or passwords in your supporting statement to give access to judges.

     

    MORE INFORMATION

    Who do I contact if I have more questions?

    For specific questions about the Queensland Clarion Awards, please email Isabell Petrinic at: 新萄京娱乐stateawards@walkleys.com

Photos from the 2023 Queensland Clarion Awards Awards

Photos by Lauryn Carrihlo. If you are having trouble seeing this gallery on your phone or browser, view it on flickr.

  • All Media categories

     

    Rural Journalism supported by the Judith Neilson Institute

    • Nathan Morris, Baz Ruddick and Jeremy Story Carter, ABC, “Boom, Bust and Mistrust”

     

    Health & Science Reporting supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Emily Sakzewski, Georgina Piper, Colin Gourlay and Matt Liddy, ABC News, “This is what long COVID feels like”

     

    Business Journalism supported by O’Brien Accountants

    • Andrew Potts, Gold Coast Bulletin, “Fall of the House of Condev”

     

     Commentary, Analysis, Opinion & Critique supported by the Judith Neilson Institute

    • Cameron Atfield, Brisbane Times, “Body of Work”

     

    Sports Journalism supported by QSport

    • Zach Hope, Brisbane Times, “The Top End’s bold bid for an AFL club”

     

    Multicultural Reporting supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Stefan Armbruster, SBS, “Citizenship, an asylum boat tragedy and children in detention”

     

    Social Issues Reporting supported by Independent Education Union

    • Ben Smee, Guardian Australia, “Crisis at Citipointe”

     

    Indigenous Issues Reporting supported by Queensland Council of Unions

    •  Michael Atkin, ABC, “A First Nations Family’s Desperate Plea for Answers – What Happened to Ms Bernard?”

     

    Broadcast Interview supported by Queensland Police Union

    • Seven News Team, Seven Network, “Beach Rescue”

     

    Innovation supported by Telstra

    •  Colin Gourlay, Georgina Piper, Tim Leslie, Cristen Tilley and Matt Liddy, ABC News, “The Australian Election map has been lying to you”

     

    Three Headings supported by Ten News First

    •  Baz McAlister, The Courier-Mail & Sunday Mail

      

    New Journalist of the Year supported by 新萄京娱乐

    •  Ellie Grounds, ABC, “Body of Work – ABC Western Queensland and triple j Hack

     

    Print/Text categories

     

    Print/Text News Report supported by Nine News

    •  Jessica Marszalek, The Courier-Mail/Sunday Mail, “Integrity in the Palaszczuk Government”

     

    Print/Text Feature Article supported by Local Government Association of Queensland

    • Leisa Scott, QWeekend, The Courier-Mail, “Alyssa’s Story”

     

    Radio/Audio categories

     

    Radio News Current Affairs supported by 新萄京娱乐

    •  Rachel Riga and Kate McKenna, ABC News, “K’gari (Fraser Island) bushfire RTI”

     

    Radio Documentary and podcast supported by Media Super

    • Hedley Thomas, Isaac Irons, David Murray, Slade Gibson and Lydia Lynch, The Australian, “Shandee’s Story”

     

    Photography categories

     

    Best Metropolitan News Photograph supported by 新萄京娱乐

    •  Lachie Millard, The Courier Mail, “Memphis Comes Home”

      

    Photographic Essay supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Brian Cassey, freelance photojournalist, (for The Australian), “Covid Vax & Ice Cream”

     

    Television/Audio Visual categories

     

    TV News Report supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Seven News Team, “Flood Disaster”

      

    TV Current Affairs, Feature, Documentary or Special Broadcast supported by Queensland Police Union

    •  Anne Connolly, Ali Russell and Stephanie Zillman, Four Corners, ABC, “State Control”

     

    The John Bean Memorial Award for Television Camerawork supported by ABC

    • Michael Lloyd, ABC, “Fighting for Equality”

     

    Regional and Community categories

     

    Regional And Community Feature Article or Opinion Piece supported by Serafino Wines

    •  Harry Clarke, Country Caller, “Territory tale of trauma, tragedy, hope and adventure”

     

    Regional And Community News Report – Print/Text supported by the Judith Neilson Institute

    •  Shayla Bulloch, Townsville Bulletin, “Uncovering the North Queensland child safety system”

     

    Regional and Community – Broadcast Report supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Nathan Morris, Baz Ruddick and Jeremy Story Carter, ABC, “Boom, Bust and Mistrust”

     

    Regional and Community – News Photograph supported by Seven News

    • Caitlan Charles, Townsville Bulletin, “Blackened and Bruised”

    Major Awards

     

    Investigative Journalism supported by Brisbane Airport Corporation

    • Anne Connolly, Ali Russell and Stephanie Zillman, Four Corners, ABC, “State Control”

     

    Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism supported by University of Queensland

    • Pat Welsh, Seven Network


    2022 Journalist of the Year
    supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Anne Connolly, Ali Russell and Stephanie Zillman, Four Corners, ABC, “State Control”

  • All Media categories

    Rural Journalism supported by Rural Press Club

    • Jemima Burt, ABC Far North, Queensland Bulletin and YouTube, “Weipa under the thumb of Rio Tinto”


    Health Reporting
    supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Michael Atkin, ABC News Online and ABC 7.30, “Home Care Desperation – The Long Wait For Help”

     

    Business Journalism supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Liam Walsh, Jenny Wiggins, Jonathan Shapiro and Hans van Leeuwen, The Australian Financial Review, “Ploughing into Greensill’s Aussie interests”

     

    Commentary, Analysis, Opinion & Critique supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Peter McCutcheon, ABC News Online, “Queensland election politics”

     

    Sports Journalism supported by QSport

    • Rikki-Lee Arnold, QWeekend and www.couriermail.com.au, “Tackling the Taboos”

     

    Multicultural Reporting supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Jessica Rendall, ABC News Online and 7pm TV News, “Migrant Voters”

     

    Social Issues Reporting supported by Independent Education Union

    • Leanne Edmistone, QWeekend,The Courier-Mail and couriermail.com.au, “Just Call Me Dad”

     

    Indigenous Issues Reporting supported by Queensland Council of Unions

    • Michael Atkin, ABC 7.30 and ABC News Online, “Abuse Of Power: Sexual Abuse Allegations In Youth Detention”

     

    Broadcast Interview supported by QLD Police Union

    • Peter Fegan and Rebeka Powell, Nine News, “Andrew Laming”

     

    Artwork, Cartoon, Illustration or Graphic supported by Media Super

    • Lewi Hirvela, iView, ABC Weekend Breakfast and ABC News Channel, “Australian Dinosaurs in 3D”

     

    Innovation supported by Telstra

    • Tim Leslie, Simon Elvery, Georgina Piper, Cristen Tilley and Matt Liddy, ABC News Digital, “Why after a century of talking about climate change, now is the time to act”

     

    Three Headings supported by Ten News First

    • Renard Peters, The Courier-Mail and Brisbane Sunday Mail, “Sport Courier-Mail”

     

    Most Outstanding Final Year Journalism Student – Graduating 2021 supported by O’Brien Accountants

    • Sarah Richards, ABC Online, “Stories about people with disabilities”

     

    New Journalist of the Year supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Elise Williams, The Sunday Mail and The Courier-Mail, “Body of Work”

    Print/Text categories

    Print/Text News Report supported by Nine Queensland

    • Emily Toxward, Gold Coast Bulletin and online, “The silicosis crisis that’s killing young stonemasons”

     

    Print/Text Feature Article supported by Local Government Association of Queensland

    • Kate Kyriacou, The Sunday-Mail, “You’ve Got Three Minutes to Save My Life”

    Radio/Audio categories

    Radio News Current Affairs supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Josh Robertson, ABC AM, “Cover up in aged care”

     

    Radio Documentary and podcast supported by Media Super

    • Amanda Gearing and the Guardian team, The Guardian and The Guardian Podcast, “Coercive control laws would have saved their lives”

    Photography categories

    Best Metropolitan News Photograph supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Annette Dew, The Courier-Mail, “The Face of the Pandemic – A Daughter Grieves Alone”

     

    Photographic Essay supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Brian Cassey, The Courier-Mail and The Australian, “Mornington Island – The Queenslanders Left Behind”

    Television/Audio Visual categories

    TV News Report supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Peter Fegan and Rebeka Powell, Nine News, “Andrew Laming”

     

    TV Current Affairs, Feature, Documentary or Special Broadcast supported by QLD Police Union

    • Rebecca Armstrong, Angela Leonardi, Quentin McDermott and Helen Grasswill, ABC Australian Story, “About a Boy”

     

    The John Bean Memorial Award for Television Camerawork supported by ABC

    • Scott Kyle, ABC Television, “730 Christmas Island”

    Regional and Community categories

    Regional And Community Feature Article or Opinion Piece supported by Serafino Wines

    • Joe Hinchcliffe, The Fassifern Guardian & Tribune, “Death of a Saleyard”

     

    Regional And Community News Report – Print/Text supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Lea Emery, Gold Coast Bulletin, “The human face of domestic violence”

     

    Regional and Community – Broadcast Report supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Rachel McGhee, ABC News 7PM TV bulletin, “Golden age of drag”

     

    Regional and Community: News Photograph supported by Seven Network (Brisbane)

    • Brendan Radke, The Cairns Post, The Courier Mail, The Australian, The Townsville Bulletin, The Gold Coast Bulletin and The Daily Telegraph, “Arrest of a murder suspect”

    Major Awards 

    Investigative Journalism supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Mark Willacy and Rory Callinan, ABC News Online, “Who Dares Kills”

     

    Journalist of the Year supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Peter Fegan and Rebeka Powell

     

    Outstanding Contribution supported by The University of QLD

    • Ann Lund

  • Nancy Bates, winner of the 2020 Clarion for Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism.

    All Media categories

    Rural Journalism supported by Rural Press Club

    • Sarah Elks, The Australian, “The Grosvenor investigation”

    Judges’ comments: “Sarah Elks’ Grosvenor investigation is a showcase of journalism at its finest – exclusively obtained documents, tenacious reporting, a thorough and detailed examination of the facts, a distillation of complex subject matter into a form that can be easily understood, backed up by a timeline of events and punchy analysis. Relying on trusted sources and human case studies, Sarah’s work seeks to hold government, business and other stakeholders to account.”

    Health Reporting supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • ABC News Story Lab, ABC News Digital, “ABC News Story Lab COVID-19 coverage”

    Judges’ comments: “The COVID 19 story is a huge and rapidly-moving one, with so much information it is easy for the consumer to be overwhelmed. This work simplifies complex data by using a conversational tone with easy-to-understand graphics. The main feature is its simplicity of style and design which makes the information easier to digest. It is the sort of production that enables people to remember the content. The creativity and innovative thinking behind this work make it a standout entry.”

    Business Journalism supported by O’Brien Accountants

    • Liam Walsh and Jonathan Shapiro, The Australian Financial Review, “Dunked: Behind Mayfair 101”

    Judges’ comments: “What started out as a hunch between two journalists led to a deep-dive investigation that revealed an investment black hole. Liam Walsh and Jonathan Shapiro’s coverage of Mayfair 101 was put under extra pressure when all the related advertising was withdrawn from their paper. Their investigation ultimately illustrated why stories like theirs must be pursued in the face of financial and outside pressures.”

    Commentary, Analysis, Opinion and Critique supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Mike O’Connor, The Courier-Mail, “Body of Work”

    Judges’ comments: Good journalism depends upon informed opinion: facts that lead to a reasonable conclusion. Liberally mix that with a rare talent like Mike O’Connor’s, and you have a deliciously potent cocktail. Mike’s musings here have a light touch that combine humour, style and bite. The stuff from which ideas grow.”

    Sports Journalism supported by QSport

    • Eliza Reilly, Gold Coast Bulletin, “Line in the sand”

    Judges’ comments: “The judges felt that the entry demonstrated an in-depth knowledge of the round and good maintenance of contacts. Eliza broke new angles which helped move the story forward and eventually led to a backdown from SLSA. She used a mixture of news and feature writing to tell the story.

    “Entries from Peter Badel for The Courier Mail and Brittney Kleyn, for the ABC rounded out a strong field for the Sports Journalism category this year.”

    Multicultural Reporting supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Stefan Armbruster, SBS News Online, SBS World News 1830 Bulletin, “Untold stories from multicultural Australia”

    Judges’ comments: “The destruction of stone walls to make way for a hospital car park in Cudgen, NSW, could have been unremarkable. Stefan Armbruster’s report brought home just how important the walls were to the descendants of the South Sea Islander labourers who built them. It was a moving story, highlighting the little known history of possibly Australia’s worst-treated migrant group. Stefan’s diverse stories from multicultural communities were of deep significance to the people involved. Congratulations Stefan.”

    Social Issues Reporting supported by Independent Education Union

    • Josh Bavas, ABC TV News and ABC News Online, “Angelo vs Bupa – A student’s fight for life”

    Judges’ comments: “This was a difficult category to judge because of the sheer volume and high quality of entries as well as diverse range of social issues. Josh Bavas’ exclusive report on a Colombian student’s David and Goliath battle to get his cancer treatment covered by a multinational health insurer, at the height of the coronavirus pandemic was a powerful piece of public interest journalism. Sensitively handled, the reporting achieved maximum impact in a matter of life and death.”

    Indigenous Issues Reporting supported by Queensland Council of Unions

    • Amy McQuire, Griffith Review 65: Crimes and Punishments, “White Justice, Black Suffering: Extracting False Confessions”

    Judges’ comments: “Amy McQuire has a deep, personal connection to her story ‘White Justice, Black Suffering’. Her research helps the reader discern clarity of an important topic with immense psychological complexity. The compelling story flows seamlessly, and cleverly explores case studies and professional opinion. If great journalism is to inform and educate, this piece ticks all the right boxes. While first-person rarely works as a writing technique, judges felt this was a rare case which demanded the author’s emotive connection to an issue many people would struggle to understand.”

    Broadcast Interview supported by QLD Police Union

    • Tim Arvier, The Today Show and Nine News – National daytime coverage, “Live Reporting in Minneapolis”

    Judges’ comments: “This is a standout example of live reporting, with Tim Arvier taking his viewers into the chaos of the Minneapolis Black Lives Matter protests. Standing in the middle of the mayhem, with police at one end reluctant to intervene and protesters at the other hovering over an injured man, Tim navigated the tension and danger of the situation to report fairly and accurately on the stand off. It is a textbook perfect example of live news reporting incorporating on the spot interviews which informed viewers and offered buy-in to a critical moment in US history.”

    Artwork, Cartoon, Illustration or Graphic supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Tony Bela, The Sydney Morning Herald, “Apollo 11 – 50 year anniversary”

    Judges’ comments: “Starting with just a blank canvas, Tony Bela has put together a pivotal moment in history. It is easy to understand, using wording, graphics, great colouring and a wonderful flow for the reader. The result is a graphic that belongs in every classroom, and will educate adults too. The story of the moon landing has never looked better.”

     

    Innovation supported by Telstra

    • Tim Leslie, Ben Spraggon, Joshua Byrd, Nathan Hoad and Cristen Tilley, ABC News Digital, “How climate change has impacted the world since your childhood”

    Judges’ comments: “The judges felt, in a field of outstanding online content, this entry by the ABC News Digital team demonstrated a very deliberate approach to personalised information delivery and individual engagement. Examining an often-heard statement in the complicated area of climate change, “we had this weather when I was a child” the content felt connected, direct, and looked not only at past climate impacts but towards future modelling.

    The construction of the platform was user-friendly while complex, and delivered effortlessly to the user. A clear intention to cut through a white-wash of information and reach the user was at the centre of this approach. A remarkable level of research and data analysis was transformed into something tangible and relatable. Leaving the user with knowledge as well as questions.”

    Three Headings supported by Ten News First

    • Baz McAlister, The Courier-Mail, “Apoocalypse Now”, “The Windsor of Our Discontent” and “You Shook ‘Em All Night, Elon”

    Judges’ comments: “Crafting eye-catching headlines that hook a reader in is no easy feat, but Baz McAlister’s clever play on words certainly hits the mark. From the Royals “Windsor of our Discontent”.. to the great toilet paper shortage “Apoocalypse Now”, Baz ‘s work delivers a first impression that sells the story in a unique style, making him a deserving recipient of this award.”

    Most Outstanding Final Year Journalism Student – Graduating 2020 supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Nibir Khan, ABC News Online and JACDigital via Adobe Spark, “Coverage of the Rohingya and Muslim Communities in Queensland”

    Judges comments: An outstanding entry introducing Nibir Khan as a big-picture storyteller. He shows a global perspective, even visiting a refugee camp in Bangladesh as a “one-man crew’’ to reveal the different lives of two Rohingya cousins – one living in Australia and the other in the camp. His work demonstrates original, important and ambitious journalism, of which much more experienced journalists would be proud.”

    New Journalist of the Year supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Marian Faa, ABC News Online and PM, “Ethical concerns over military’s COVID-19 drug trials”

    New Journalist of the Year:

    Judges’ comments: “Marian Faa was at the leading edge of a story of national interest – no mean feat for a young journalist in far north Queensland. Her reports on plans to trial Coronavirus drugs on soldiers addressed legitimate concerns and highlighted cracks in the process of a controversial decision. They were timely, topical and well-researched. Marian impressed the judges with her assured radio current affairs reporting.”

     

    Print/Text categories

    Print/Text News Report supported by Nine Queensland

    • Kelmeny Fraser, The Courier-Mail, “Blow the Whistle – Hospitality Investigation”

    Judges’ comments: “Kelmeny’s investigation into the wages and timesheet scandal at a popular Queensland hospitality chain was an excellent example of what can happen when a journalist keeps digging. Working from an initial tip-off she produced some compulsive reading that will hopefully lead to change within the industry.”

    Print/Text Feature Article supported by Local Government Association of Queensland

    • Kate Kyriacou and Thomas Chamberlin, QWeekend, The Courier-Mail and The Sunday Mail, “Childers – the 20th anniversary”

    Judges’ comments: “The judges felt this was an exquisitely written feature piece, which intertwined the stories of the people directly involved in such a devastating event. The stories brought together the elements the judges were looking for. A piece which showcased creative flair and left an impact on the reader, while the supporting article included strong newsworthy elements such as exclusive details about the man behind the devastating blaze, which had not be unearthed over the past two decades. All three judges identified this as an outstanding piece of journalism which took readers on the emotional journey, while uncovering chilling facts about the killer.”

     

    Radio/Audio categories

    Radio News Current Affairs supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Mark Willacy, Alexandra Blucher and Rory Callinan, ABC AM, “The Village Idiot Killing”

    Judges’ comments: A standout amongst a high calibre of nominations, Mark Willacy’s report surrounding the alleged shooting of a disabled man in Afghanistan and its subsequent cover up demonstrated Willacy’s persistence and tenacity in storytelling. Willacy not only gained the trust of former SAS soldiers and witnesses to blow what was already an explosive previous Four Corners exclusive wide open, but he told it in a way that took listeners to the scene from the outset with his use of imagery and sound.”

    Radio, Documentary and Podcast supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • David Murray, Chris Bosley and Eric George, The Australian, “The Lighthouse podcast”

    Judges’ comments: “David Murray, Chris Bosley and Eric George’s podcast was a captivating exploration of the mysterious disappearance of Belgian tourist Theo Hayez in Byron Bay last year. While there was a string of commendable crime-related podcasts in this year’s entries, “The Lighthouse” podcast was a stand-out. With slick production and with a well-written script – driven by Murray’s investigative reporting instincts – the podcast fleshed out new details and allowed listeners to become part of the investigation into the unsolved crime.”

     

    Photography categories

    Best Metropolitan News Photograph supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Dan Peled, The Sydney Morning Herald, The Guardian, Financial Times, AAP and EPA, “Baptism of Fire”

    Judges’ comments: His dramatic image of a mother’s fear and determination as she holds her baby with her world about to be engulfed. Dan showed a cool headed professionalism as he framed all of the elements to capture the horror of Australia’s last summer.”

    Photographic Essay supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Lachie Millard, The Courier-Mail, “Sunshine Coast Fires”

    Judges’ comments: “In a field rich with images capturing aspects of the past year’s tumultuous events, the judges chose Lachie Millard’s multi-faceted series on last September’s fires that devastated familiar Sunshine Coast communities. Graphic action shots of brave firies confronting flames, helicopter water-bombing and kids escaping on bikes contrasted with bleak images of human sorrow amidst the ruins.”

     

    Television/Audio Visual categories

    TV News Report supported by QUT

    • Tim Arvier, Nine News and The Today Show, “Minneapolis Burning”

    Judges’ comments: An obvious winner on every level of news reporting. Calm under pressure, no embellishment of the circumstances surrounding them, just raw reporting from a danger zone. Accurate and incisive, a movie producer would struggle to recreate the moving sequence of action Tim and Adam documented in vision and live voice over back to Australia. A perfect blend of gutsy camerawork and live commentary. A model of modern live news reporting that will be taught in journalism courses for years to come. The crew faced extreme danger together in this coverage. Television is a visual medium… cameraman Adam Bovino deserves equivalent praise for this award alongside his journalist Tim Arvier. Live TV at its best.”

    TV Current Affairs, Feature, Documentary or Special Broadcast supported by QLD Police Union

    • Mark Willacy, Four Corners, “Killing Field”

    Judges’ comments: “Mark Willacy has again set the benchmark for this category with an outstanding piece of investigative and agenda setting work. ‘Killing Field’ meticulously uncovered never before seen proof that some of our elite soldiers committed war crimes in Afghanistan. It required gaining the trust of members of the notoriously secretive special forces, as well as months of painstaking research and verification. It ticked every judging criteria for the category; incisive, impact, public benefit. The story was followed by every major news outlet nationally and internationally, in what is a forerunner to undoubtedly the most significant scandal facing Australia’s defence forces in the months ahead.”

    The John Bean Memorial Award for Television Camerawork supported by ABC

    • Luke Dorrington, Channel Seven News, “Country QLD COVID Comeback”

    Judges’ comments: “The three finalists demonstrated the many aspects of a good television news package in different ways. The camerawork helps to tell the story. The photography must be of a high standard but the essential elements needed to edit a story together in a logical way must be there. These include close-ups, interesting angles, variety of shot sizes and good cutting points.

    “Stephen Cavenagh’s Stanthorpe Fire footage complemented the script and also showed a very good eye and some excellent compositions. Peter Collins’ Toowoomba House Fire story showed and conveyed the drama of a rescue and was very well covered so as to tell the story well.

    “The winning entry by Luke Dorrington was a package of three news stories and two live crosses in outback Queensland. The photography in each was well executed and took advantage of the best times of day for light. Clever angles in the first story gave extra interest and in all there was a good variety that kept the story moving. The live shots were well composed and lit to make the best advantage of the background.”

     

    Regional and Community categories

    Regional and Community Feature Article or Opinion Piece – Print/Text supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Paul Weston, Gold Coast Bulletin, “Michael Yarwood – the last six months”

    Judges’ comments: Paul Weston’s insightful piece adds textured layers to a story outline that is familiar to readers in his region. The feature relays the human story behind the facts and affords a voice to all players in the sad saga, painting word pictures without obvious sentiment or sympathy. It is thoroughly researched, well crafted, and commendably balanced.”

    Regional and Community News Report – Print/Text supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Madura McCormack, Townsville Bulletin, “Clive’s Cash”

    Judges’ comments: “Madura McCormack’s series ‘Clive’s Cash’ was a stand-out entry for its research and public impact. Drawing on ASIC records and contacts, Madura revealed Clive Palmer’s financial backing of Independent candidate for Townsville City Council Greg Dowling. This brought national attention to the issue of local government electoral funding. Strong journalism.”

    Regional and Community – Broadcast Report supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Douglas Smith, The Point NITV, “The Power of Repatriation: Returning stolen Indigenous remains and artefacts to where they rightfully belong”

    Judges’ comments: “Douglas Smith’s story was a standout from an excellent field. His story gave viewers an insight into a sensitive issue that would never get similar coverage from mainstream media. It was a well produced piece that gave the viewer terrific detail and showcased his skill set, contacts and knowledge of the issue.”

    Regional and Community News Photograph supported by Seven Network (Brisbane)

    • Alistair Brightman, Fraser Coast Chronicle, “Covid Couples”

    Judges’ comments: “Alistair’s thoughtful image, brings together three elements: a beautiful environment, couples walking together and the necessity of social distancing. The image symbolises the long shadow the pandemic has cast over all of us. Alistair lifted what could have been a standard weather pic to a portrait of the world we have all been forced to adjust to.”

     

    Major Awards

    Investigative Journalism supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Mark Willacy, Four Corners, “Killing Field”

    Judges’ comments: “Mark Willacy’s investigation into Australia’s elite special forces was compelling viewing. The never before seen footage, damning interview with Braden Chapman backed up by local villagers truly revealed the extent of the “Killing Field”. The ramifications of this Four Corners report for our soldiers and the military as a whole will be far reaching. “Killing Field” encompasses the attributes of a fine investigative report. The extensive research and ability to cultivate contacts to take part in the story, combined with the strong vision, good scripting and interviewing makes it compelling viewing. The bravery of the whistleblower and the reporting team in pursuing this impactful story is evident.”

    Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism supported by The University of QLD

    • Nancy Bates

    Judges’ comments: “Nancy Bates is a legend of Queensland journalism – the state’s first ever woman editor of a daily newspaper, a ferocious advocate for her regional community and an invaluable mentor for a generation of journalists.

    “She wrote an estimated 5.500 editorials for the Fraser Coast Chronicle during her 20 years in the editor’s chair – some of the campaigns she successfully fought for included changes to the law which had allowed men to rape their estranged wives, and convincing local schools to teach the language of the region’s traditional owners, the Butchulla. That campaign won the newspaper a United National Media Peace Award in 2008. This year the Premier named Nancy as one of nine Queensland Greats, describing her as a trailblazer in the truest sense.

    “Nancy began her career in 1966 as a cadet for New Zealand’s Bay of Plenty Times – and joined the Chronicle four years later.

    “When she retired in 2009, the then Premier Anna Bligh paid tribute to her 43 year career, telling parliament Nancy was known for her colourful turn of phrase and fiery words about all politicians.

    “In her retirement, Nancy continues to make a weekly contribution to the publication. The Chronicle’s present editor Jessica Grewal says Nancy often sends through breaking news and well-told local profiles, helping a community still grieving the loss of the local print newspaper.

    “The Fraser Coast Chronicle first published in 1860 as the Maryborough Chronicle, is one of more than 20 mastheads throughout Queensland that ceased printing a newspaper this year and moved to a digital only service.

    “It is fitting that at the end of this era, we pay tribute to one of the regional Queensland’s champions of journalism.”

    Journalist of the Year 2020 supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Tim Arvier, The Today Show and Nine News – National daytime coverage, “Live Reporting in Minneapolis” and “Minneapolis Burning”

    Judges’ comments: “The judges complimented Tim on his courageous cross from the heart of the riots in Minneapolis – a compelling 17 minutes of live television that brought to the lounge rooms of Australia the chaos that was unfolding on the streets of America – as it happened, in real time.

    “Tim and his camera operator Adam Bovino worked seamlessly as a team as bricks were thrown and tear gas fired all around them. Tim kept a cool head and his professional composure, delivering colourful but precise commentary to the pictures being captured; at one point even remembering to apologise for the language when protestors yelled out the F word! But the cross itself was just 17 minutes of the days Tim spent on the front line of the riots, negotiating roadblocks, risking arrest – and worse – to produce top-quality television journalism that would captivate audiences anywhere in the world. At one point he was even detained at gun point by police.

    “If great journalism involves having courage and engaging your audience through compelling storytelling, Tim Arvier has proven a worthy recipient of the 2020 Queensland Journalist of the Year.”

  • All Media categories

    Rural Journalism supported by Rural Press Club

    • Jayne Cuddihy, Claire Dunne, Hannah Hacon, Jacqueline Curley and Libby Twine,  Graziher Magazine, “Graziher’s North West Queensland Flood Coverage”

    Health Reporting supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Jackie Sinnerton and Antonia O’Flaherty, The Sunday Mail, “Bush Baby Crisis”

    Business Journalism supported by O’Brien Accountants

    • Kathleen Skene, Gold Coast Bulletin, “Spirited Away”

    Commentary, Analysis, Opinion & Critique supported by Three Plus

    • Josh Robertson, ABC, “Will Adani put its money where its mouth is?”

    Sports Journalism supported by QSport

    • Chris Garry, Seven News, “The Fall of a King”

    Multicultural Reporting supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Nathan Morris, ABC AM and ABC News Online, “The Toowoomba Yazidi transition”

    Social Issues Reporting supported by Independent Education Union

    • Leanne Edmistone, QWeekend, couriermail.com.au, “Long Walk Home”

    Indigenous Issues Reporting supported by Queensland Council of Unions

    • Mark Willacy and Alexandra Blucher, ABC Online, “The Watch House Files”

    Broadcast Interview supported by QLD Police Union

    • Mark Jeffery, ABC North, Far North, Western & Tropical Qld, “Flood Mud Mosquitoes and Tears”

    Artwork, Cartoon, Illustration or Graphic supported by Media Super

    • Sharni Hargrave, Luke Seib, Paul O’Leary, Michael Bliss and Frank Godoy, Seven News Brisbane, Seven News Special Broadcast, “Seven News Graphics Department – Body of Work”

    Multimedia Journalism supported by Telstra

    • Kate Kyriacou, Peter Hall and Sean Callinan, The Courier-Mail and podcast platforms, “Dead Wrong – The Jeffrey Brooks story”

    Three Headings supported by Ten News First

    • Baz McAlister, The Courier-Mail, “Time to Haul Ass”, “Give ‘Em a Finch and They’ll Take a Mine” and “Halal… Is it Meals You’re Sooking For”

    Most Outstanding Final Year Journalism Student – Graduating 2019 supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Drew Beveridge, University of the Sunshine Coast

    New Journalist of the Year supported by RACQ

    • Lucy Stone, Brisbane Times, “eHealth Queensland Investigation”

    Print/Text categories

    Print/Text News Report supported by Nine News Queensland

    • Kelmeny Fraser and Liam Walsh, The Courier-Mail, “Dirty Deeds: Ipswich Corruption Scandal”

    Print/Text Feature Article supported by Local Government Association of Queensland

    • Michael Madigan, The Courier-Mail, “Regional Queensland Roars”

    Radio/Audio categories

    Radio News Report supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Josh Robertson, ABC, “Police destruction of evidence in rape cases”

    Radio Current Affairs, Feature, Documentary or Special Broadcast supported by Media Super

    • Mark Willacy, ABC AM, “Inside the Watch House”

    Photography categories

    Best Metropolitan News Photograph supported by Brisbane City Council

    • Glenn Hunt, The Australian and The Courier-Mail, “Townsville Floods Rescue”

    Photographic Essay supported by 新萄京娱乐

    • Peter Wallis, QWeekend, “Memory Keepers”

    Television/Audio Visual categories

    TV News Report supported by QUT

    • Seven News Team, Seven News, “Seven News – NQ Flood Disaster”

    TV Current Affairs, Feature, Documentary or Special Broadcast supported by QLD Police Union

    • Mark Willacy, ABC Four Corners, “Out of the Dark”

    The John Bean Memorial Award for Television Camerawork supported by ABC

    • Luke Dorrington, Seven News Brisbane, Seven News Special Broadcast, Queensland Drought Appeal 2019, “Queensland Drought”

    Regional and Community categories

    Regional And Community Feature Article or Opinion Piece supported by Serafino Wines

    • Aaron Smith, Torres News and Cape York News, “Birds of a feather”

    Regional And Community News Report – Print/Text supported by New Hope Group

    • Tom Gillespie, The Chronicle and The Courier-Mail, “The Boy in the Barrow”

    Regional and Community – Broadcast Report supported by Adoni Media

    • 7 News Townsville, Seven News Townsville, “Townsville Floods”

    Regional and Community: News Photograph supported by Seven

    • Zak Simmonds, Townsville Bulletin and The Courier-Mail, “Weight of the water”

    Major Awards

    Investigative Journalism supported by Brisbane Airport Corporation

    • Mark Willacy, ABC Four Corners, “Inside the Watch House”

    Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism supported by The University of QLD

    • Terry Sweetman

    Journalist of the Year 2019 supported by Griffith University

    • Mark Willacy

  • All the winners of the 2018 Queensland Clarion Awards.
     

    More than 430 entries were submitted for the 2018 awards ranging across many categories including crime, the environment and politics. Read on for all this year’s winners and finalists.

    All Media – Business Journalism

    Sponsored by O’Brien Accounting

    Winner:

    • David Lewis, Suzanne Smith, Jess O’Callaghan and Leila Shunnar, ABC, A Whiskey Business

    Finalists:

    • Kathleen Skene, Gold Coast Bulletin, Con Games 2018
    • Liam Walsh, The Courier Mail/Sunday Mail, The Ponzi King
    • Liam Walsh The Courier Mail/Sunday Mail, Dark Clouds Over Blue Sky

    Judges’ Comment: The judges agreed that the standard of entries in the business journalism category was extremely high this year, and all the finalists should be congratulated. This year’s winning entry – ‘A Whisky Business’ – was a truly outstanding piece of journalism. It tells the story of hundreds of unwary investors seduced by a seemingly successful, high-end brand and duped into purchasing often non-existent barrels of whisky on the promise of generous returns. The impact of this scam was wide-reaching. The story involved extensive research and featured exclusive interviews with individual investors, former staff, the company’s former brand ambassador Matthew Hayden, and the head of the company that was left to deal with the fallout. It was beautifully constructed and masterful story-telling, distilling a complex subject into an accessible and compelling tale where the final chapter, police investigations in both Queensland and Tasmania, is yet to be played out.

    All Media – Commentary, Analysis, Opinion & Critique

    Sponsored by Three Plus

    Winner:

    • Paul Syvret, The Courier Mail, Don’t Drink the Kool Aide

    Finalists:

    • John Birmingham, Brisbane Times, Blunt Instrument
    • Sherele Moody, News Regional (News Corp), Challenging Narratives on Violence Against Women and Children

    Judges’ comment: This was a strong, diverse field that emphasises how well served Queenslanders are for quality commentary. The winner, Paul Syvret, deftly crafts wit and wisdom to produce well researched arguments that leave you in no doubt of his opinion. These three examples embody the demanding art of compelling opinion writing. His piece on Lady Bjelke-Petersen was a particularly potent outlier that swam against the tide of emotion that followed the former politician’s death. His linkage of Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton’s treatment of overstaying au pairs to that on offer for asylum seekers was proselytization at its most powerful. Column three was a clever use of same-sex marriage opponents’ own words to expose the paucity of proof in their arguments for the status quo. A worthy winner whose weekly columns will be sorely missed.

    All Media – Health Reporting

    Sponsored by Bond University

    Winner:

    • Janelle Miles, News Corp, Healing Hands

    Finalists:

    • Leanne Edmistone, News Corp, A Matter of Death and Life
    • Andrew McMillen, The Australian, Susan, Unbroken

    Special Mention

    • Aaron Smith, Regional and Remote Newspapers, Institutional Racism in Queensland Health

    Judges’ comment: “Healing Hands” is a moving testament to the pioneering work of retired Queensland burns surgeon, Doctor Stuart Pegg, whose work has placed Queensland at the forefront of burns treatment in the world. Janelle Miles pens a lucid exposition of Dr Pegg that captures the skill, compassion and humanity that has healed the bodies and soothed the minds of countless Queensland burns victims. Miles seamlessly transits from poignant descriptions of an extraordinary ‘bedside’ manner to chronicle the determination and persistence that has placed Queensland’s specialist burns support among the world’s best. “Healing Hand” is a feature piece of the highest order and a worthy winner of this category.

    All Media – Broadcast Interview

    Sponsored by Qld Police Union

    Winner:

    • Ben Murphy, Seven Network, Hanson Sex Shop

    Finalists:

    • Matt Wordsworth, ABC, Logan City Council
    • Sharyn Ghidella, Damien Hansen, Erin Flessas, Danny Burton and Tim Foster, Seven Network, Las Vegas Shooting Investigation

    Judges’ comment: Ben Murphy’s short, but high-impact, interview with a One Nation candidate during an election press conference gave viewers and the party’s leader a shock. The reporter made the best use of information he found on a website linked to a sex shop owned by the candidate; information that was news to party leader Pauline Hanson, who was standing next to him. Ben Murphy came to the press conference well armed with the fresh information. His clinical questioning, focussing on comments on the sex shop’s social media site, and the responses from an angry party leader who didn’t like those questions, made for captivating television and showed democracy in the raw. As Ben Murphy said, “Nothing beats genuine surprise in politics.”

    All Media – Indigenous Issues Reporting

    Sponsored by Queensland Council of Unions

    Winner:

    • Clare Armstrong, Townsville Bulletin, Kyburra’s Missing Millions

    Finalists:

    • Michael Atkin, ABC, Cleveland’s Shame: Self-harm and Suicide in Detention Centres
    • Leisa Scott, Qweekend, The Courier Mail, Jackie Huggins

    Judges’ comment: The judges thought this was a great, in-depth dig into improper use of money from an Indigenous organisation. After this story, a resulting Federal Court Case found the money was linked to an illegal deal with Adani. The judges commended her tenacity and high quality journalistic skill to pursue the story while.  The judges also thank everyone who entered; there were great, quality stories covering a range of issues.

    All Media – Most Outstanding Journalism Student

    Sponsored by Media Super

    Winner:

    • Tayla Larsen, University of Sunshine Coast, Body of Work

    Highly Commended/Finalist

    • Claire Boughey, QUT, Body of Work

    Finalists:

    • Noor Gillani, QUT, In the World of Ecology
    • Claire Boughey, QUT, Body of Work

    Judges’ comment: “The judges found Tayla’s story submissions instantly engaging, with a focus on letting the subjects tell their stories in their own words. Her submissions showed great range, from social issues such as a piece on eating disorders, to highlighting stories of remarkable people such as a nearly-blind artist. Tayla’s writing style is mature and polished, and her video submissions showed a keen eye for visual storytelling, allowing the details to flow naturally at their own pace. Her work shows self-driven initiative and a natural curiosity about a range of subjects which will serve her well and she progresses in her career.”

    All Media – Multicultural Reporting

    Sponsored by 新萄京娱乐

    Winner:

    • Daniel Nolan and Lulu Harrison, A Current Affair: Nine Network, Immigration Success

    Finalists:

    • Jacob Wilson, Jimboomba Times, Tales of Harrowing Religious Prosecution
    • ABC Interactive Digital Storytelling, ABC, Hear me Out

    Judges’ comment: The judges thought this story was a surprising and timely look at how immigration can work during dog whistling about African gangs in Melbourne.  The story highlighted Toowoomba’s success story and helped to challenge the audience’s perception of immigration.

    All Media – Rural Journalism

    Sponsored by Rural Press Club

    Winner:

    • Dominique Schwartz and Alexandra Blucher, ABC, Tension on the Tracks

    Highly Commended/Finalist

    • Leisa Scott, Qweekend The Courier Mail, Pick of the Crop

    Finalist:

    • Stephen Stockwell, Triple J Hack, ABC, Solar Approval Drama

    Judges’ comment: In this competitive category, the Tension on the Track reports stood out for their strong story-telling and public impact. Dominque Schwartz and Alexandra Blucher took viewers on a multi-media journey to communities affected by one of the Federal Government’s biggest and most controversial projects. The result was an innovative mix of colourful features, hard news and insightful analysis. Judges also highly commended Leisa Scott’s beautifully written piece on the positive experiences of seasonal workers

    All Media – Social Issues Reporting

    Sponsored by Independent Education Union

    Winner:

    • Ruth De Glas, and Emma Griffiths, ABC, Focus: How Can the DV Abuser Change?

    Finalists:

    • Clare Armstrong, Townsville Bulletin, Women’s Centre in Crisis
    • Leisa Scott, Qweekend, The Courier Mail, Holly’s Choice

    Judges’ comment: Despite the large number of entries demonstrating excellence in this year’s Reporting Social or Community issues category, the judges were unanimous in deciding the winning entry. The judges all agreed the ABC Radio Brisbane Focus entry How Can a DV Abuser Change was extremely powerful. This story featured two domestic violence perpetrators, who had previously been jailed, telling their stories and sharing their rehabilitation. Contemporary media coverage often features people experiencing Domestic Abuse but rarely do we hear from perpetrators in such a confronting and honest way. Of particular note is the significant level of trust established with the perpetrators that allowed them to share their stories in such a compelling manner. Importantly in this program the perpetrators took responsibility for their actions, understood the need for change, and gave advice to abusers who may have been listening making this a significant conversation about this urgent social issue.

    All Media – Sports Journalism

    Sponsored by 新萄京娱乐

    Winner:

    • Andrew Hamilton and Peter Badel, The Courier Mail, Turf War: The Battle for Survival for Queensland’s Sporting clubs

    Finalist:

    • Michael Atkin, ABC, Mathew Lodge’s Troubled return to NRL
    • Peter Badel, The Courier Mail, The Matt Lodge saga
    • Sam Squires, Nine News, Playing with a Broken Neck

    Judges’ comment:

    Judges felt Turf War was an excellent example of investigative sports reporting. Andrew Hamilton and Peter Badel went past the sports sheds to examine the serious issues around the long-term viability of Queensland’s most beloved football clubs. Delving into their balance sheets and working a range of contacts across the codes, their systematic investigation of operating costs in Queensland, compared with other states, uncovered crippling, government-sanctioned gouging that forced the Premier herself to step in. The series saw Annastacia Palaszczuk announce her own probe of the issues. The Stadiums Queensland board were ultimately sacked and new, fairer contracts were signed, including one that saved the Gold Coast Titans $300,000 a year and helped safeguard their survival.

    All Media – New Journalist of the Year

    Sponsored by QLD Parliamentary Media Gallery

    Winner:

    • Amy Mitchell-Whittington, Brisbane Times, Body of Work

    Finalist:

    • Madura McCormack, Daily Mercury/ News Regional Media, Body of Work
    • Ben Murphy, Seven Network, Body of Work
    • Alexandra Utting, The Courier Mail, Body of Work

    Special Mention:

    • Jack McKay, The Courier Mail/ Sunday Mail, Body of Work

    Judges’ comment:Amy’s compassionate and ethical approach when faced with a sensitive story results in powerful storytelling. Her Body of Work includes the widow’s story of a surgeon’s suicide and the bravery of an 80 year old who stopped an domestic attack. These are powerful examples of stories that move you, full of terrific observations and a journalists curiosity. Amy’s curiosity is evident when she says she takes a story and ‘sees where it leads’. This is a take home for all new journalists.

    All Media – Investigative Journalism

    Sponsored by Brisbane Airport Corporation

    Winner:

    • Michael McKenna, Sean Parnell, and Sarah Elks, The Australian, Mangocube

    Finalist:

    • Hedley Thomas and Slade Gibson, The Australian, The Teacher’s Pet
    • Mark Willacy and Alexandra Blucher, ABC, Body of Work

    Special Mention:

    • Inge Hanson, Frasier Coast Chronicle, Revenge Porn: Australian Women Targeted in Online Hate Campaign

    Judges’ comment: ‘Entries in this category were of an exceptionally high standard and spanned a breadth of mediums, treatment and approaches. Collectively, the judges found them a reassuring reminder that quality investigative journalism is alive and well, and continuing to serve the public interest. The three finalists were outstanding, making the choice of Mangocube by Michael McKenna, Sean Parnell and Sarah Elks particularly difficult and much discussed. This investigation from scratch over many months stood out as genuine breaking news that continues to raise serious questions about decision-making at the highest levels of the Palaszczuk Government. It was dogged, traditional journalism that exposed uncomfortable truths despite a legal blitzkrieg designed to thwart publication. The series has led to two Crime and Corruption Commission investigations and an overhaul of ministerial rules regarding back-channel communications. It continues as a source of discomfort for the State Government.’

    All Media – Multimedia Journalism

    Sponsored by Telstra

    Winner:

    • Melanie Pilling, Daniel Knowles and Peter Hall, The Courier Mail, S.O.O – Save Our Schoolkids

    Finalists:

    • Stephan Armbruster, SBS Interactive Storytelling, South Sudanese ‘Lost Kids’ Remember Civil War
    • Josh Bavas and Nick Wiggins, ABC, Trouble in Paradise

    Judges’ comment: This entry by Melanie Pilling, Peter Hall and Daniel Knowles is an outstanding example of quality journalism and the impact a story can have when published across a number of platforms and publications. With child drowning numbers increasing at an alarming rate, the team from the Courier Mail developed an extraordinary and innovative campaign that highlighted the tragic situation, capturing the attention of the entire state in the process. Pooling resources and thinking outside the square, the Courier Mail team convinced every single one of its sister publications and websites across Queensland to run the same front page on the same day, creating world newspaper history. In what was described as an exhaustive collaboration, some 46 newspapers and their respective websites were involved, delivering a co-ordinated message that took the publication of a particular news story to a new level that resonated with readers.

    All Media – Cartoon Illustration or Graphic

    Sponsored by 新萄京娱乐

    Winner:

    • Sharni Hargrave, Paul O’Leary, Luke Seib, and Michael Bliss, Seven Network, Body of Work

     Finalist :

    • Nine News Team, Nine News, Body of Work

    Judges’ comment: This category was judged on the best use of creativity, wit, style and newsworthiness through artistic media. Once, graphics were confined to simple on-screen supers, but they now extend to creating integrations, visual packages and virtual sets. The best of news graphics deliver additional flair to broadcasts and enhance the impact news stories have on the viewing audience. They are created under tight deadlines in the context of a breaking news environment. Channel 7’s submission, which features graphics for stories as diverse as 2018 election, Queen’s baton relay, and an NRL tips segment, achieved this with polish and sophistication that all looks deceivingly simple to the entertained and informed viewer. A commendation to the Nine News entry.

    News Photograph- Metropolitan

    Sponsored by Network 10

    Winner:

    • Tertius Pickard, Freelance, World Champion

    Finalists:

    • Brian Cassey , Freelance , Smuggling Food Into Abandoned Manus Detention Centre
    • Annette Dew, News Corp, Lord of the Wings

    Judges’ comment:Winning and losing is a battle, the kind of battle that often takes place in the blink of an eye. Any news photographer attempting to capture that blink is acutely aware when he or she’s witnessing history in the making. The image captured, if successful, will become timeless, encapsulating that one epochal event. Any truly great photograph, as we all know, provides the viewer with the who, what, when, where and why of what’s happening. But there is another ingredient that falls outside these categories. It’s called emotion, and whether it be grief or triumph it is always an elusive quarry. This image has captured forever the exultation and ecstasy etched across boxer Jeff Horn’s face as the realization dawns: “I’m champion of the world.”

    Photographic Essay

    Sponsored by 新萄京娱乐

    Winner:

    • Brian Cassey, Freelance ,Inside Abandoned Manus Detention Centre

    Highly Commended/Finalist:

    • Dylan Crawford, Griffith University, Stolenwealth Games

    Finalists:

    • Nigel Hallett, The Courier Mail, Breaking the Ice

    Judges’ comment: Brian Cassey stand-out entry captured poignant and dramatic images in a high-stakes operation to sneak into the former Australian-run Manus Island detention centre under the noses of Papua New Guinea and Australian authorities. The first Australian journalists on site in years with Rory Callinan, Brian had just 18 minutes on the ground to shoot the photos used widely across News Ltd outlets and elsewhere. They showed the world the appalling conditions the 600 men were living in after a PNG court ordered the detention centre “illegal” and close for breaching the country’s constitution. A special mention for fellow finalist Dylan Crawford for his photo essay “StolenWealth Games”, with judges saying this student journalist showed huge future potential.

    Print/Text – Feature Article

    Sponsored by Local Government Association of Queensland

    Winner:

    • Kate Kyriacou, The Courier Mail, The Betrayal of Tiahliegh

    Finalist:

    • Elissa Lawrence, News Corp, Drowning in Plastic
    • Andrew McMillen, The Australian, Susan, Unbroken
    • Leisa Scott, QWeekend, The Courier Mail, Holly’s Choice

    Judges’ comment: The judges were impressed with the excellent standard of entries in this category, but agreed that Kate Kyriacou’s was the standout piece. Kate’s storytelling blended already known facts of this distressing event with previously untold, yet vital details. This gave the reader a deeper insight into how the story unfolded, and how the CCC processes helped to bring about the eventual convictions. The judges took into account the creative online presentation of the story, the perfect balance of facts and emotion in the writing, and the excellent use of social media exchanges at the time.

    Print/Text – News Report

    Sponsored by Nine News Brisbane

    Winner:

    • Mark Willacy and Alexandra Blucher, ABC, Body of Work

    Finalists:

    • Michael McKenna, Sean Parnell and Sarah elks, The Australian, Mangocube

    Judges’ comment: The entry by Mark Willacy and Alexandra Blucher exposed serious allegations of corruption within the Logan City Council. The year-long investigation culminated in the arrest of Mayor Luke Smith who was charged with multiple offences including perjury. The tenacity and determination of both journalists is evident is this stand-out entry, having painstakingly searched through reams of council documents, conducted freedom-of-information requests and ultimately uncovered inconsistencies in the Mayor’s statements. This series included exclusive content that sparked a CCC investigation highlighting the real-world results that are possible through dedication reporting.

    Print /Text – Best Three Headings

    Sponsored by Seven Network

    Winner:

    • Baz McAlister, News Queensland , “Bold McDonald has No Charm”; “Debbie Does Dalliances”; “Throw in the Towels…”

    Finalists:

    • Daniel Johnson, News Queensland , “Another Clique on the Wall”; “Celebration of Church and Skate”; “Angel cast in Anu light”
    • Renard Peters,  The Courier Mail ,“A Mare Formality”; “Jason Decliner”; Ageing Acefully”

    Judges’ comment: Baz has submitted three headlines that stand out for their vitality, originality and wit. Under the pressure of tight newspaper deadlines, he stopped us on the page and compelled us to read on. On the diverse topics of a TV anchorman’s departure, Cyclone Debbie’s blackout baby boom and the labour-inducing potential of Jeff Horn’s impending world title fight, Baz demonstrated his versatility and flair for the invaluable art of headline writing.

    Radio/Audio – Current Affairs, Feature Documentary or Special

    Sponsored by Watpac

    Winner:

    • Hedley Thomas and  Slade Gibson, The Australian, The Teacher’s Pet

    Highly Commended/ Finalist

    • Ruth de Glas and Emma Griffiths, ABC, Focus: How Can the DV Abuser Change?

    Finalist:

    • Katherine Gregory, ABC, Inside QLD’s Health Institutions

    Judges’ comment: The Teacher’s Pet, a Queensland produced investigative podcast series into the disappearance of Lyn Dawson 36 years ago has become a worldwide phenomenon. Two coroners ruled she had been killed by her husband, the now Queensland resident Chris Dawson but he has never been charged. Journalist Hedley Thomas investigated the suspected murder of the mother-of-two over six months. Thomas and audio producer and composer Slade Gibson then produced 14 weekly episodes in a live investigation format that allowed new witnesses and evidence to be presented as it was being unearthed. As a result, police have taken statements from new witnesses over the disappearance, launched Task Force Southwood to investigate historical sexual assaults and student teacher relationships on Sydney’s northern beaches. There has also been a public apology from NSW police Commissioner Mick Fuller to Mrs Dawson’s family for past police failings in their investigation. The series has had more than 14 million downloads and went to the top of the ITunes podcast charts in Australia, UK, NZ, Canada and the USA.

    Radio/ Audio – News Report

    Sponsored by 新萄京娱乐

    Winner:

    • Chris O’Brien, ABC, QLD Politics Roundup

    Finalist:

    • Allyson Horn, ABC ,Rick Thorburn Sentencing
    • Stephen Stockwell, ABC :Triple J, QLD turns on ID Scanners

    Judges’ comment: An ability to turn the beige in to something bright, and a tactile talent in explaining why the machinations of George St and beyond are worthy of the attention of the every-day ‘normal’ Queenslander made Chris O’Brien’s ‘Body of Work’ submission the uncontested winner of this category. While the judging panel did debate at length the specifics around what constitutes a ‘Radio News Report’, it was unanimously agreed that the newsworthiness of the content collated and shared by Mr O’Brien in an engaging, compelling and often entertaining manner made the journalist a worthy winner.  The judges were impressed by the very high standard of entries in this category in 2018, but noted a decline in submissions compared to previous years.

    Regional & Community – Print/ Text: News Report

    Sponsored by AGL Energy

    Winner:

    • Paul Weston, Gold Coast Bulletin, CCC Bombshell: Mayor CEO in the Spotlight

    Highly Commended/Finalist:

    • David Chen, ABC, Theodore maternity services
    • Megan Hendry, ABC, Con Games 2018

    Finalist:

    • Kathleen Skene, Gold Coast Bulletin, Death Symbols Banned from ADF

    Judges’ comment: These stories combined to put a spotlight on the Gold Coast city council, ultimately leading to a ccc probe. The investigative nature of this work was outstanding. Judges were impressed with the quality of entries.

    Regional & Community – Broadcast Report

    Sponsored by 新萄京娱乐

    Winner:

    • Nicole Bond, ABC, The Good, The Bad and the ugly: Drought And Optimism in Western QLD

    Finalist:

    • Kallee Buchanan ,ABC, Farm Lending Practices
    • Brendan Mounter ABC Regional, ABC Far North Sonic security

    Judges’ comment: Drought is a regular story in Queensland, but the judges felt Nicole Bond’s series brought fresh attention and new perspectives to an important news story that had, at the time, slipped off the radar. The reporting required a large amount of research, cajoling and travelling, and the result was a series of stories well produced for radio, television and online. That such high-quality reports can be produced almost singlehandedly by the reporter demonstrates how skilled regional journalists have become in reporting across a range of platforms. The reporter’s writing and photography were outstanding, as was the impact from this series of reports.

    Regional & Community – Print /Text: Feature Article or Opinion:

    Sponsored by Serafino Wines

    Winner:

    • Sherele Moody, News Regional, Challenging Narratives on Violence Against Women

    Finalists:

    • Daniel Bateman, The Cairns Post, Disappearance on the Reef
    • Rachel Riley, Townsville Bulletin, Iraq, A New Hope

    Judges’ comment: The judges congratulate all who entered this category. Whether it was giving big national issues a local focus or highlighting a feature of living in regional Australia, each entry was of a high quality. However, Sherele Moody’s series of articles about violence were a standout. Sherele combined intensely personal information with sharp analysis to produce truly memorable and original commentary on a difficult subject.personal and compellingly written.

    Regional & Community – News Photograph

    Sponsored by 新萄京娱乐

    Winner:

    • Zak Simmonds, The Townsville Bulletin, Coal lot of trouble

    Finalists:

    • Alistair Brightman Fraser Coast Chronicle , Selfie Government
    • Evan Morgan, Townsville Bulletin, Quamby

    Judges’ comment: This series of photos is a powerful example of news photography at its best. Timely, newsworthy and delivering real impact, they revealed and documented emotions and tensions in a community divided by strongly held views, with conservation on one side and job creation in a region under intense pressure on the other. The photographer anticipated the clash and responded quickly to capture strong, dynamic action shots. Each of the extraordinary photos told a different story and invited the viewer to spend more time considering the positions and emotions of the people within it, including the fascinating interplay of power balance between the tiny female policewoman and the angry protestor.

    Television – Current Affairs, Feature Documentary

    Sponsored by Queensland Police Union

    Winner:

    • Mark Willacy, ABC Four Corners, All That Glitters

    Finalists:

    • Michael Atkin, ABC , How D.V.A failed army veteran Jesse Bird
    • Mark Willacy and Ben Hawke, ABC, The Dome

    Judges’ comment: All That Glitters was an incisive feature story that was thoroughly researched, planned and presented. It was a stand out in the category, tackling head-on issues with clear public interest and benefit. Matters raised in this feature helped spark local government reforms, and a fresh investigation by the Queensland corruption watchdog. The expose prompted repeated attacks on the Four Corners program, including a defamation action, by Gold Coast Mayor Tom Tate. It stood out in a very strong field of contenders showcasing excellent quality journalism’

    Television – The John Bean Award for News and Current Affairs Camerawork

    Sponsored by ABC

    Winner:

    • Brendan Mounter, ABC, Prisoners Raising Gentle Cattle

    Judges’ comment: The judges commended Brendan Mounter for demonstrating a clear understanding of what is required to tell a story through pictures. By awarding this prestigious honour the judges recognised a high level of potential in the future for this multi-skilled storyteller.

    Television News Report

    Sponsored by QUT Creative Industries

    Winner:

    • Ben Murphy, Paula Doneman and Carly Egan, Seven Network, Antoniolli Arrest

    Finalists:

    • Ben Murphy, Seven Network, Hanson Sex Shop
    • Sarah Greenhalgh, Seven Network, Sikorsky Manhunt

    Special Mention

    • Alexandra Blucher and Mark Willacy, ABC, Logan City Council – Body of Work

    Judges’ comment: The judges found the quality of the entries in this category to be exceptionally high. The winning entry, featuring the arrest of Ipswich Mayor Andrew Antoniolli was one of the biggest news stories of the year, on the back of the arrest of previous Ipswich Mayor Paul Pisale. Seven broke the story with vision of Antoniolli entering the Ipswich police station to be charged with official corruption. The story demonstrates strong contacts, and great collaboration between the Crime Editor and journalists and crew. This is an important story in the still-unfolding investigation into local government corruption in Queensland. The judges were also impressed with the other two finalists. Channel 7’s coverage of the manhunt and siege involving Slatko Sikorsky was well-presented, well scripted and contained compelling original vision on the M1; and exclusive witness interviews. The Hanson Sex Shop story shows the great importance and impact of journalistic initiative – journalist Ben Murphy went outside the scripted agenda on the Battler Bus to uncover the questionable background of recently announced One Nation candidate for Thuringowa. The Judges have also Highly Commended ABC journalists Alex Blucher and Mark Willacy for their Logan City Council investigative stories which showed strong research, exclusive vision and information of great public importance.

    Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism

    Sponsored by The University of Queensland

    Winner:

    • Ben Hawke

    Judges’ comment: Our winner started journalism in 1973 as a newspaper cadet, three years later moved to the broadcast arena and has never – as far as we can tell – looked back. Newspaper journalism was the loser. He has worked for channels 2, 7, 9 and Sky, and may even have sneaked in a couple more gigs elsewhere in his annual holidays. Wherever he worked he inspired friendship for his personality, admiration for his skills and gratitude for his mentoring. He has demonstrated to almost an entire generation of Australian broadcast journalists, as one colleague said, that “you could garner a huge viewing audience and do quality journalism at the same time”. It’s not just Queensland journalism that has gained – he has had a great effect nationally, and is a worthy recipient of the Most Valued Contribution to Journalism award.

    2018 Queensland Journalist of the Year

    Sponsored by Griffith University

    Winner:

    • Kate Kyriacou

    Judges’ comment: In her four-part in-depth coverage of the short life and tragic death of 12-year-old Tiahleigh Palmer, Kate Kyriacou showed what exceptional use an experienced, highly skilled journalist can make of a raft of contacts. Added to that she deployed high range interviewing skills and the ability to persuade sources to open their files – and their memories – about distressing events. As with all effective journalistic narratives, only time will tell if Kate’s work will lead to attitude changes that can make life safer for victims such as Tiahleigh, or indeed hasten the apprehension of those who commit such horrendous crimes. But there is a good chance that it will because her work has laid completely bare the circumstances around Tiahleigh’s murder, and those who followed the series will certainly not let the memory slide.


  • The winners have been announced in this year’s Clarion Awards – Queensland’s major awards for journalistic excellence – which are administered by 新萄京娱乐.

    More than 450 entries were submitted for the 2017 awards ranging across many categories including crime, the environment and politics.

    The winners of this year’s Clarions were announced at a gala presentation dinner on Saturday 26th August in the Boulevard Room of the Brisbane Exhibition and Convention Centre, Southbank, Brisbane.

    The Courier-Mail‘s David Murray was named the 2017 Queensland Journalist of the Year. The Clarion judges said: “After being approached by the parents of missing schoolgirl Rachel Antonio, David conceived the idea of a podcast that could uncover seemingly neglected aspects of the investigation into her disappearance. It took him four months of research, planning and travel as he traced and recorded witnesses, sourced material and scripted five episodes of 35-40 minutes each, with the assistance of digital editor Sean Callinan… David’s work has opened the door to the possible solving of the mystery of her disappearance and giving her grieving parents some resolution.”

    John Henningham of Brisbane’s JSchool was acknowledged for his 40 years of service by being awarded the Clarion for Most Oustanding Contribution to Journalism. The judges commented: “It is difficult to over-emphasise the impact that John Henningham has had on Australian journalism… John broke ground by gaining the first Australian doctorate in journalism and becoming the country’s first journalism professor, then continued his pioneering work with JSchool, which for decades has imparted the professional skills that young journalists need, coupled with rigorous academic teaching.”

    The All-Media Clarion for New Journalist of the Year went to the Townsville Bulletin’s Chris McMahon. “His coverage of major crime events in North Queensland was thorough, comprehensive and well-written. Chris used his contacts and initiative to find fresh leads and new angles to produce pages of gripping content,” the judges said. 新萄京娱乐 proudly congratulates all the winners of the 2017 Clarion Awards.

    All Media – Business Journalism

    • Liam Walsh: The Courier-Mail: Caught in a corrupt web

    All Media – Commentary, Analysis, Opinion & Critique

    • Sherele Moody: The Daily Telegraph‘s Rendezview, Various: Agent of Change

    All Media – Health and Wellness

    • Elissa Lawrence: QWeekend, The Courier-Mail: True Grit

    All Media – Broadcast Interview

    • Bruce Atkinson: Various ABC Radio programs: Drama At Long Tan

    All Media – Indigenous Issues Reporting

    • Michael Atkin: ABC TV’s 7.30 Program: Rough justice: The Treatment of Young Indigenous Offenders in North QLD

    All Media – Most Outstanding Journalism Student

    • Jessica Stewart: QUT: Body of Work

    All Media – Multicultural Queensland Award

    • Kristine Taylor, Roger Carter, Greg Hassall: ABC TV’s Australian Story: Australian Story: A Field of Dreams

    All Media – Rural Journalism

    • Dominique Schwartz: ABC TV’s 7pm News: Death Row Dingos

    All Media – Social Issues Reporting

    • Kirstin Murray, Roger Carter: ABC TV’s Australian Story: Tough Love

    All Media – Sports Journalism

    • Grantlee Kieza: The Courier-Mail: The Jeff Horn-Manny Pacquiao fight

    All Media – New Journalist of the Year

    • Chris McMahon: Townsville Bulletin: Body of work

    All Media – Investigative Journalism

    • Michael Atkin: ABC TV’s 7.30 Program, ABC News Online: Investigating the Rise and Fall of Careers Australia

    All Media – Freelance Journalism

    • Andrew McMillen: The Weekend Australian: Body of Work

    All Media – Multimedia Journalism

    • David Murray, Sean Callinan: The Courier-Mail, The Courier-Mail Online: Searching for Rachel Antonio

    All Media – Cartoon Illustration or Graphic

    • Tony Bela: The Courier-Mail: Dreamworld Tragedy

    Photography – News Photograph- Metropolitan

    • Annette Dew: The Courier-Mail: Faces of Tragedy

    Photography – Photographic Essay

    • Zak Simmonds: Townsville Bulletin: Crim Reality

    Print/Text – Feature Article

    • Andrew McMillen: The Weekend Australian: Dying Wish

    Print/Text – News Report

    • Mark Willacy, Alexandra Blucher: ABC News Online: Environment Series

    Print /Text – Best Three Headings

    • Daniel Johnson: Qweekend Magazine/The Courier-Mail: “Give a Dog a Clone”, “Four Legs and a Funeral” and “Winging It at Yoga Can Be a Real Gas”

    Radio/Audio – Current Affairs, Feature Documentary or Special

    • David Murray, Sean Callinan: The Courier-Mail Online: Searching for Rachel Antonio

    Radio/ Audio – News Report

    • Mark Jeffery: ABC Radio North & Far North Queensland: Farmers Attack Defence

    Regional & Community – Print/ Text: News Report

    • Paul Weston: Gold Coast Bulletin: Thin Grim Line

    Regional & Community – Broadcast Report

    • Ben Millington: ABC TV’s Lateline and AM Current Affairs Radio: Inside Cleveland Youth Detention

    Regional & Community – Print /Text: Feature Article or Opinion

    • Alexandria Utting, Paul Weston, Wayne Watson: Gold Coast Bulletin: Control Freak: The Tara Brown Murder

    Regional & Community – News Photograph

    • Justin Brierty: The Cairns Post: Don’t Shoot

    Television – Current Affairs, Feature Documentary

    • Paula Doneman, Michael Usher, Duncan McNab, Stephen Peters, Mark Llewellyn: Channel Seven: Murder Uncovered – Who killed Leanne Holland?

    Television – The John Bean Award for News and Current Affairs Camerawork 

    • Scott Kyle: ABC TV’s 7.30 Program: Quinkan Country

    Television News Report

    • Nine News Team: Nine Network: Cyclone Debbie

    Most Outstanding Contribution to Journalism

    • John Henningham

    2017 Queensland Journalist of the Year 

    • David Murray

  • All the winners of the 2016 awards.

    All Media – Broadcast Interview

    Sponsored by Media Entertainment & Arts Alliance

    Winner

    • Kay McGrath, Paula Doneman, Seven Network, Terry Lewis’s Last Card

    Finalists

    • Annie Gaffney, Karyn Wood, ABC Sunshine Coast, Sunshine Coast Man Caught-up in Christmas Island Riots

    Judges’ comments:

    “Kay McGrath and Paula Doneman’s interview with disgraced former Queensland police commissioner Terry Lewis was the stand-out in this year’s category. Based on meticulous research and hard-earned contacts, the Lewis interview was a chance to re-visit a key character from one of the state’s darkest periods. The experienced McGrath struck the right balance, allowing Lewis to put his side of the story but also holding him to account over his answers and his behaviour which ultimately led to him being jailed for corruption and fraud and stripped of his knighthood. There were also new revelations about Lewis’s time in jail. The archival research by Doneman, a veteran crime reporter, and McGrath also helped put the events in context for those who may not have been around for the Fitzgerald Inquiry. The Lewis interview showed the power of a long-form broadcast interview – something that is becoming increasingly rare in modern journalism.”

    All Media – Business Journalism

    Sponsored by Brisbane Airport Corporation

    Winner

    • Sarah Elks, The Australian, Unmasking Terry Smith

    Finalists

    • Mark Ludlow, Fairfax Media/The Australian Financial Review, The rise and fall of Queensland Nickel and Clive Palmer
    • Michael McKenna, The Australian, Adani
    • Liam Walsh, The Courier-Mail, Guvera: Greatest hits and misses

    Judges’ comments:

    “The collapse of Queensland Nickel was one of the biggest business stories of the year, with the Australian newspaper and the Financial Review often leading the coverage. In this highly competitive environment, the judges were impressed by Sarah Elk’s series of exclusives, including one of the defining details of the whole saga – Clive Palmer’s bizarre decision to go by the pseudonym Terry Smith.”

    All Media – Commentary, Analysis, Opinion & Critique

    Sponsored by Three Plus

    Winner

    • Mark Ludlow, Fairfax Media/The Australian Financial Review, Lunch with The AFR & more

    Finalists

    • John Birmingham, Brisbane Times/Fairfax Media, Blunt Instrument: Body of Work
    • Jacinda Tutty, The Courier Mail/ News Queensland, #Techtalk

    Judges’ comments:

    “Mark Ludlow’s columns filed for the Australian Financial Review represented an entertaining, informative and important collection of work. Addressing subjects as diverse as a sportsman’s near fatal medical condition, the personal side of life after politics for a former minister, profiles about key Queensland political figures and a critical look at the state Budget, Ludlow’s work both entertained and informed. His journalism revealed an ability to engage with a number of powerful and intriguing interview subjects and encourage some frank admissions in a manner that provided fertile material for comment. In some cases, his subjects opened up about topics which they had rarely discussed previously or in any great detail. As a result his work was always relevant and on occasion provided up to date insights or even information about controversial issues that had not been previously reported. The columns while lengthy were excellently back-grounded giving context to the new insights being presented. The result was a body of work that was both newsworthy and eminently readable. The pieces were exceedingly well researched, creatively solid, original and newsworthy.”

    All Media – Health and Wellness

    Sponsored by Diabetes Queensland

    Winner

    • Janelle Miles, The Courier-Mail, Gift of Love

    Finalists

    • David Lewis, ABC, Mount Isa Mines still breaching national air quality guidelines
    • Lucy Smith, Daily Mercury, Re-emergence of black lung in Queensland

    Highly Commended

    • Claudine Ryan

    Judges’ comments:

    “This real life or death drama had you in its grip from the start, with raw medical details of how a person is kept alive while waiting for an organ transplant. One family’s heartbreak in death, followed by another’s elation at a second chance of life through organ donation is conveyed with both directness and compassion. The story details how a grieving family’s decision to donate a loved one’s organs three years earlier not only saved the interviewee’s life, it allowed her to create a new one as she later had a baby. The judges felt the story not only creates an emotional response, but gives a direct call to action – to discuss organ donation with your family and make sure they know your wishes. Janelle said she set out to write a story that would ignite a community conversation about organ donation, and she succeeded.”

    All Media – Indigenous Issues Reporting

    Sponsored by Queensland Council of Unions

    Winner

    • Brian Bennion, APN News and Media/The Queensland Times, Is Nothing Sacred? – Deebing Creek Mission

    Finalists

    • Allyson Horn, ABC News, Indigenous Queensland: Body of Work
    • Dominique Schwartz, Australian Broadcasting Corporation , Closing the Gap with better ear health

    Highly Commended

    • Trent Dalton

    Judges’ comments:

    “All entries in this section were inspiring, covering a wide range of indigenous issues in an accurate, “non-highbrow” way with warmth, intelligence, empathy and humour. From this excellent work, including radio, television, print and online entries, we chose the best-prepared pieces which broke important news and walked readers inside indigenous communities. The judges were equally-impressed by the no-nonsense cultural sensitivity shown in all entries, allowing the reporting to be told in a straightforward way. The copy is one feature entry was truly gorgeous. However, one piece however stood out for all judges because it had the real news “wow factor”. This winning entry was well researched, written in good clean copy, accurately covered the community anger and anguish of a serious evolving issue and ultimately forced a change local authorities and developers. At the conclusion of a series of stories it broke the reality of a previously-undocumented mass grave of indigenous people – proven on underground radar – at one of Queensland’s earliest aboriginal missions, the Deebing Creek Mission near Ipswich as a housing development is being considered. And it left us asking “Why don’t we know about this?”

    All Media – Most Outstanding Journalism Student

    Sponsored by Media Super

    Winner

    • Joseph Ogilvie, Queensland University of Technology, Body of Work

    Finalists

    • Hannah Kotaidis, Queensland University of Technology, Body of Work
    • Catherine Moore, University of the Sunshine Coast, Body of Work

    Judges’ comments:

    “The judges agreed this was a very strong body of work across print, radio and television, showing a grasp of the three platforms. We were impressed with the range of subjects, from human interest stories such as the trans-gender and domestic violence stories to the Baden-Clay High Court case which distilled complex legal arguments to an easy-to-digest package for television. This showed a great understanding of not only the topical and complicated subject but of the medium and how to use it effectively. The judges also highly commended Jorgia White, especially her work on the human trafficking and child labour scandal in the cocoa industry.”

    All Media – Multicultural Queensland Award

    Sponsored by Media Entertainment & Arts Alliance

    Winner

    • Leisa Scott, News Corp, The Road Ahead

    Finalists

    • Stefan Armbruster, SBS World News, Queensland’s diversity – Body of work
    • Cindy Wockner, News Corp, Right at Home

    Judges’ comments:

    “A perceptive and skilfully-crafted piece that takes the reader into the home of an Afghan refugee, and her family, living in Toowoomba. “The Road Ahead” uses small details to paint a vivid picture of the challenges and benefits of the family’s new home in Australia, as well as providing insights into the lives they have left behind, and the difficult decision to leave. The piece steers clear of cliché and sentimentality, bringing a fresh perspective, currency and context to a much-covered topic. Leisa Scott treats her subjects with respect and sensitivity, whilst still being unafraid to ask difficult questions. A worthy contribution to the national debate on refugees and multiculturalism.”

    All Media – Rural Journalism

    Sponsored by Rural Press Club

    Winner

    • Kirstin Murray, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Baby Cash

    Finalists’ road casting 

    • Elly Bradfield, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, St George’s ice struggle
    • Mark Willacy, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, The Final Battle

    Highly Commended

    • Janelle Miles

    Judges’ comments:

    “Kirstin’s entry, `Baby Cash’ was a gripping, well-executed story about a rare parasite active in warm water. It not only highlighted a single family’s pain, but revealed wider, potentially deadly implications for other rural households. Kirstin went to considerable effort to obtain interviews with the doctors and families affected. The piece was beautifully shot and edited, and told with empathy and insight through the eyes of the parents of baby Cash.”

    All Media – Social Issues Reporting

    Sponsored by Network Ten

    Winner

    • Heidi Davoren, Matthew Liddy, Lucy Fahey, Ben Spraggon, Colin Gourlay, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, These women are not just statistics

    Finalists

    • Stefan Armbruster, SBS World News, Detention centre cancer consuming Manus Island
    • Trent Dalton, The Australian, Chain Reaction

    Judges’ comments:

    “The panel thought that all three were excellent examples of the craft. In the case of Stefan Armbruster’s Manus Island Detention Centre stories, the fact that Stefan was able to get a camera INSIDE the centre, and shine a light on conditions that the Governments of Australia and PNG had gone to great lengths to keep covered up, made this a riveting story. In Trent Dalton’s chilling “Chain Reaction”, he was able to give a concrete example of the much-discussed (but rarely detailed) trans-generational cycle of sexual abuse. But the standout story in the category, the judges felt, was “These Women are not just statistics”. The team led by Heidi Davoren was able to bring to light each of these victims of violence in a way that the bare bones of their stories could not. While the stories could have been told in a traditional format, the use of hypertext links from each woman’s image (or the lack of an image, for cultural reasons) was considered a great example of using the online medium to its best advantage – creating a montage of interrelated stories within a single overarching portal. But behind the ‘bells and whistles’ of the presentation, more important than the medium, was the message. Each individual story was like a shock to the system, each ‘vignette’ made the judges feel anger, and sorrow, and grief. Taken as a combined whole, the judges felt this was an important, and truly award-worthy, piece of journalism.”

    All Media – Sports Journalism

    Sponsored by Lion

    Winner

    • Nance Haxton, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Why are boxers dying in Queensland?

    Finalists

    • Peter Badel, The Courier-Mail, League legend’s cocaine addiction
    • Mike Colman, News Queensland , The Medal Factory

    Judges’ comments:

    “She tackles an important but largely unreported subject, deaths in the boxing ring and identifies dangerous flaws in the system in Queensland and the Northern Territory. She uses Freedom of Information legislation to expose inaction from governments of both sides of politics in Queensland. The judges felt that of all the high quality entries in this category this was the campaign that could and should lead to changes in policy within the sport and at government level and could potentially even save young lives.”

    All Media – New Journalist of the Year

    Sponsored by Queensland Parliamentary Media Gallery

    Winner

    • Rhian Deutrom, News Corp, Body of Work

    Finalists

    • Jonathan Hair, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Body of Work
    • Rachel Riley, Townsville Bulletin, Social media suicide

    Judges’ comments:

    “The high standard of journalism among the emerging members of our industry gives great hope for the future. The three finalists exemplified that in their talent, professionalism and commitment to the craft. Rhian Deutrom‘s work was a stand-out for her comprehensive and revealing stories on the problems at Lady Cilento Hospital and contamination in Oakey. The judges were particularly impressed with Rhian’s tenacious reporting in getting to the truth of the Department of Defence’s cover-up of its toxic mess in the Darling Downs’ community. Rhian led the coverage of the emerging scandal, and delivered exclusive reports that exposed the government. It led to the federal government announcing a $55 million assistance package for locals facing property depreciation and health concerns. The series – which included news reports, feature articles and online packages – also led to the government committing to land buybacks, blood tests and counselling for the most vulnerable in the community.”

    All Media – Investigative Journalism

    Sponsored by WATPAC

    Winner

    • Sarah Elks, The Australian, Unmasking Terry Smith

    Finalists

    • Stefan Armbruster, SBS World News, Detention centre troubles consuming Manus Island
    • Owen Jacques, APN Australian Regional Media. Wanted “Death Ship” captain discovered in Queensland

    Judges’ comments:

    “The common thread between these disparate reports was their high standard of journalism. The judges genuinely found them difficult to separate. The quality and breadth of entries across print, radio and television show investigative journalism in Queensland to be in great health and forcing lasting change. The reporting of the Queensland Nickel collapse by Sarah Elks, of The Australian, particularly stood out for its tenacity and newsworthiness. The judges were impressed by Elks’ agenda-setting pursuit of the QNI yarn. Elks’ reports constantly led the way in extremely competitive circumstances, divulging inconvenient truths behind the multimillion-dollar collapse. Elks’ series of exclusive reports, including the unmasking of “Terry Smith” as businessman Clive Palmer, were the pay-off for her determined shovel work in developing a network of contacts – from lunchrooms to boardrooms – whose information fuelled her dogged pursuit. Her work is a tremendous “how-to” for journalists young and old and deserves recognition.”

    All Media – Freelance Journalism

    Sponsored by Bond University

    Winner

    • Andrew McMillen, Various, Body of work

    Finalists

    • Brian Cassey, Courier Mail, News Corp, Cairns Post + Others, Portraiture in the News/Body of Work
    • Andrew Stafford, Various, Body of work

    Judges’ comments:

    “The judges were impressed by the diversity and overall high quality of his work. He maintains a strong voice through his elegant prose but never “takes over” the stories, allowing the subjects to be central to his storytelling. He manages to research and present highly sensitive subjects such as Story Bridge suicides (“Over Troubled Water”) and the sketching of stillborn babies (“Etched in Memory”) without clichés or allowing emotion to overtake the messages.”

    All Media – Multimedia Journalism

    Sponsored by Telstra

    Winner

    • Tim Leslie, Will Ockenden, Simon Elvery, Colin Gourlay, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, What your metadata reveals about you

    Finalists

    • Matthew Liddy, Gregor Salmon, Ben Spraggon, Colin Gourlay, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Southern Exposure: the growing, glowing allure of the aurora australis
    • Blythe Moore, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Outback Yacht Club

    Highly Commended

    • Marty McCarthy

    Judges’ comments:

    “Tim Leslie’s entry – What your metadata reveals about you – took on a very complicated issue and broke it down into simple steps. By accessing the telephone, text and internet records of one person’s smart phone, Tim was able to reveal an astonishing amount of information about that individual. But, the cleverness of this entry was the multi-layered approach it took in telling the story. Beyond just showing us what all this data actually looks like and how it works, the audience was invited to interact with the data. This active and unique approach drove home how much detail of our lives can be revealed to others – a fascinating and frightening experience.”

    All Media – Cartoon Illustration or Graphic

    Sponsored by The Walkley Foundation

    Winner

    • Tony Bela, The Courier-Mail, Game of Toads

    Finalists

    • Sharni Hargrave, Seven Network, Body of Work – The dynamics of graphics
    • Steve Quirk, Nine Network, Body of Work – Implementing real 3D into TV News

    Judges’ comments:

    “Tony Bela’s Game of Toads was a standout in this category. He used an idea so simple it did not need instructions and created a humorous and clever work of art that is both an entertaining board game and exciting online offering. The artwork appeals to both children and adults and plays beautifully on Queensland’s profound parochialism during the State of Origin series. A fun, charming, yet sophisticated idea, very well executed.”

    Photography – News Photograph- Metropolitan

    Sponsored by Media Entertainment & Arts Alliance

    Winner

    • Luke Marsden, The Courier-Mail/ The Sunday Mail, Kindergarten Cops

    Finalists

    • Liam Kidston, News Corp Australia, Beirut Bungle
    • Jono Searle, News Queensland, Toolbox Tomb

    Highly Commended

    • Annette Dew

    Judges’ comments:

    “This powerful image by Luke Marsden graphically illustrates the problem of a town under siege, where gangs of drug-affected children as young as six roam the streets of Mt Isa committing crimes and acts of violence. The viewer is struck by the age of these children and the situation in which they find themselves. We often see images of adults in this situation but it is shocking to see children as young as these being questioned by police when they should be in bed. One child is seen trying to hide a paint can which he had been sniffing from the police. It’s a timely image given the controversy surrounding youth detention centres. Luke has expertly shown understanding of the ability of his camera to capture the sombre mood of this image using only the available street light.”

    Photography – Photographic Essay

    Sponsored by Media Super

    Winner

    • Liam Kidston, News Corp. Australia, Beirut Bungle

    Finalists

    • Brian Cassey, News Corp, Manus – Heaven & Hell
    • Tara Croser, News Corp Australia, One Punch: Cole Miller

    Judges’ comments:

    “The jailing of the 60 minutes team and Brisbane mother Sally Faulkner was one of the biggest stories of the year. This was a tough assignment in a foreign country where news crews had been faced with deportation for doing their job. Liam was also under constant threat of arrest and confiscation of his gear. It’s a job where his pre-planning and use of local knowledge paid off. Showing a mastery of his craft, Liam was able to capture all the major players at crucial moments in the last days of the saga. Using contacts and working out various scenarios before their